FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SUBSCRIPTION SITE

To make it easier to understand the subscription site, following are my responses to frequently asked questions (click on the links to expand the sections and read my responses):

How exactly will a subscription to your site help me to pass the exam?Answered 10/17.

Response Date: October 2017

First, I suggest you try my UBE Score Estimator to see if you even need to subscribe. If the UBE Score Estimator tells you that you are expected to pass by 20 points or more and you are taking a bar review (e.g. Barbri, Kaplan, Themis) while studying full-time, you do not need to supplement your bar studies. However, if you are not expected to pass by 20+ points, or you are not taking a full bar review, or you are only studying part-time, you may want to consider subscribing to improve your reduced odds of passing. I offer a full subscription site that contains all my advice and materials along with smaller modules that only provide access to certain parts of the subscription site and/or materials.

The subscription site is somewhat like a long written tutoring session with a lot of good material and information. For example, I have statistically analyzed the scores from over 4,000+ failing examinees and post-exam follow-ups from 2,000+ examinees (both passing and failing). Furthermore, I have reviewed and statistically analyzed over 3,000 essays/MPT answers from over 500 failing examinees. I collect and analyze this information because I find it invaluable in learning what mistakes examinees commonly make. Everything I do on the subscription site is geared towards improving examinee outcomes by reducing mistakes. Examinees who are considered at risk of failing the exam must seriously embrace the advice on the subscription site as it is built upon the mistakes of thousands of examinees. You must learn from these mistakes or else you are bound to make the same mistakes. Quite honestly, I feel there is no one better qualified to give examinees the correct advice on how to pass the exam. When you hire a tutor, you pay for his time with you. With the full subscription site (or a smaller module), you pay for my research and materials. I put my time into researching the exam to tell you very accurately what to expect on it. A tutor can help you to understand things you don’t understand, but what’s the point if those concepts are no longer tested or statistically not expected to appear on the upcoming exam. When this occurs, you are studying inefficiently.

Inefficient study affects all examinees, but it most seriously impacts at-risk examinees. I regard an at-risk examinee as one who is statistically more likely to fail the exam than pass it. At risk-examinees include all repeat takers and most part-time studiers. For example, over the past 20 years in New York, the February ABA Repeaters Pass Rate is 45.2% while the July ABA Repeaters Pass Rate is 32.5%. The repeater rates for foreign examinees are even lower. I made the UBE Score Estimator (which is primarily based on NYBOLE/NCBE studies) so examinees can predict an estimate of their total UBE score based on the entered demographic/grade data. The further away you are from passing, the fewer inefficiencies you can have in your studies. For example, a Domestic-educated Caucasian First-Time examinee with a high LSAT/LGPA can study rather inefficiently (e.g. not study full-time, put a lower percentage of their time into MBE study, or answer MBE practice questions from only one source, or answer only a few hundred MBE questions in practice) and still pass the exam. In contrast, if you are on the other end of the spectrum (Foreign-educated Non-Caucasian Repeat-Taker), you can’t afford any inefficiencies in your studies (meaning you should never deviate from the advice on the subscription site).

NCBE recently stated that "MBE scores are highly related to total bar exam scores." If NCBE themselves are saying that bar scores are highly correlated to MBE scores, why in the world would you focus on anything else until you were very proficient at the MBE? So how do you become proficient at the MBE? Basically, it involves studying what’s expected to be tested on it followed by a lot of practice. In my opinion, the materials on the subscription site do a better job of telling you what to expect on the upcoming MBE exam than any bar review, tutor or commercial outline. For example, if you took the UBE exam and have a recollection of a question you had a problem with, email whoever you think would be a good bar review/tutor and ask for their thoughts on it (e.g. tell them you had a particularly difficult time with that MBE question and ask for his/her insights). Then email the same question to me to see who knows more about the question. I can almost assure you it will be me. Put simply, if you don’t know what is currently tested on the exam, how can you efficiently teach that exam?

Examinees that follow the methodologies on my subscription site put a disproportionate amount of their study-time into the MBE and then through my materials, they take calculated risks on the MEE and MPT. This is what I find that works for at-risk examinees. Otherwise, lower-ability examinees try to be good at everything, but if their MBE score languishes, they almost always fail. Here are comments from passing examinees who following these methodologies. Of the thousands of subscribers that have subscribed in the past, I have never had a single one tell me they regretted subscribing. Whether the subscription site will be enough to help you pass, I don't know, but I strongly believe it will give you your best opportunity at passing. To learn more about the subscription site or the modules, read the information on this page.

Is reviewing/studying the materials from Seperac alone sufficient to pass the exam.Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

I am somewhere between a supplemental bar review course and a full bar review course. Some examinees have passed using only my materials, but most examinees use my materials to supplement their bar review (they feel overwhelmed and are looking for more pin-pointed advice on what to study). The subscription site contains everything you need for the MEE and MPT. The main thing missing from the subscription site are good MBE questions, although I have 600+ short answer MBE-type questions called Flashcard exams and I give advice on the best commercial MBE questions to use. However, I still feel that the MBE materials/advice available on the subscription site will help you significantly on the MBE. For example, the UBE MASTER OUTLINE contains 175 pages of black letter law on the 7 MBE subjects that is intended to represent the 175 graded MBE questions (meaning you won’t be blindsided by current MBE issues that receive short-shrift in other outlines). Thus, these 175 pages of content (plus another 100 pages of past MBE/MEE issues related to the MBE subjects) can essentially account for about 60-70% of your total UBE score.

Please read the Introduction section to the current UBE MASTER outline. This will give you a good explanation of how to use it. Trust the J17 UBE MASTER outline and make it your bar bible. It is highly on point, both proportionately and contextually. Thus, the new areas the MBE currently tests (e.g. Fair Housing Act) are adequately covered. I strongly believe you can pick up 5-10 MBE points just from the UBE MASTER outline’s coverage of the currently tested MBE issues (which almost all other outlines fail to appropriately cover). The UBE MASTER outline likewise covers all the perennially-tested MBE issues. For example, on my examinee form, I recently added the question “On the MBE, what percentage of MBE questions did the UBE MASTER OUTLINE fail to cover (rough estimates are fine).” To date, eleven F17 subscribers have answered the question with an average answer of 14% (meaning that according to these examinees, about 14% of the 200 MBE questions were not covered in their edition of the UBE MASTER outline). I continually refine the content and proportionality of my outline, and I expect the UBE MASTER OUTLINE to cover at least 90% of what you will see on the J17 MBE. Put simply, if you can memorize/remember the 175 pages of MBE black letter law in the outline and understand this law through the 100 pages of MBE rules built into the outline, you will be in a very good position to do well on the MBE and pass the exam.

This outline should be an excellent representation of the MBE and MEE. Aside from the black letter law sections that cover the material I expect to be tested on the upcoming exam, I also include the issues that were tested on every past released MBE and MEE exam (going back 20 years consisting of 1,600+ MBE issues and 1,300+ MEE issues). Thus, the black letter law sections of the UBE MASTER OUTLINE will appropriately tell you what to expect on the upcoming exam (both contextually and proportionally), while the built-in MBE rules and MEE issues will tell you what was tested on the past. This is about as compete a picture as you can have of the current exam. Furthermore, when you study based on the priorities, you will not be spending too much time on the past, nor too little time on the current. For example, if you study the J17 UBE MASTER outline based on priority and then consult it immediately after the MBE to see how much was missing from it – there won’t be much.

Some subscribers find the MBE Rules MP3s and the MBE Flashcard exams helpful. For example, in post-exam followups with subscribers, I ask them to specify any supplemental bar review materials, courses or tutors they used for the exam and rank them in their order of effectiveness. A subscriber with an MBE score of 137.2 on the July 2016 UBE exam told me: “Seperac (quiz, mp3s, flashcards) Kaplan Mock Exams (too easy) Adaptibar (too simplistic) Critical Flashcards (better to do them alone)” Another subscriber who passed with an MBE of 140.5 after failing with an MBE of 128.1 told me: “I would suggest that all future examinees use every portion of your site and materials and really take the time to read your website and its sections over. The advice was invaluable and helped A LOT. Literally every part of your website contributed in some way.

I strongly believe that if you follow the advice on the subscription site and can answer about 63% correct on the MBE portion of the exam, you stand an excellent chance of passing. Even NCBE has publicly stated that "MBE scores are highly related to total bar exam scores." see http://www.ncbex.org/assets/media_files/Bar-Examiner/articles/2011/800411Testing.pdf

Doing well on the MBE involves a combination of knowledge and test-taking skills (and skills require drills). Acquiring this knowledge and skill takes a lot of time – thus if you don’t have a lot of time to spend studying/practicing for the MBE, it is hard to do well on it. While study for the other components of the exam can be “abbreviated” to some extent (e.g. using my materials to abbreviate your MEE essay study or just studying certain subjects and getting lucky), MBE study really can’t be given short-shrift, nor can MBE answered be “bluffed” as with the MEE/MPT (another reason why the bar examiners rely heavily on the MBE and even use it to scale essay/MPT scores). To do well on the MBE, you should first become familiar with the law tested on past MBE questions. Thus, if you have the time, you should answer and review the 1,600 released NCBE questions. For example, to review the 1,600 released NCBE questions, it would take you about 150-200 hours to do this (assuming 1.8 minutes to read each question and 5 minutes to review each answer explanation and write a rule). For examinees that don’t have the time to do this (for example, you are following your full bar review course syllabus and using their questions or you are studying part-time), I wrote rules for these 1,600 questions (from the 1991 questions all the way up to the 2017 sample questions). A word document of these rules is 130 pages long. I also created a MBE Rules MP3 of these 1,600 questions which is about 10 hours long. While it is always better to do the question (to practice your reading comprehension and dealing with distractors), if you are short on time, this is an excellent way to acquire the black letter law behind what NCBE has tested in the past in a very efficient way. More so, these rules are prioritized based on my priorities for the upcoming exam. Therefore, the rules are broken down into 36 ranked categories (representing the 36 MBE categories in the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines) to enable examinees to study the most important categories (that will contribute the most to the examinee’s MBE score) before studying the least important MBE categories. Thus, if you are very short on time, this is an excellent way to pick up the most important law in the least amount of time.

Please note that studying these rules is only one part of your overall MBE study. While the law behind past NCBE questions will give you insight into some of the legal concepts you can expect to see on the upcoming MBE, they are not always representative. For example, out of the 1,600+ released NCBE questions, there are only two questions on Double Jeopardy (1/10 of 1% of the questions). In contrast, Double Jeopardy is tested fairly frequently on the current MBE (I expect it to represent about 1% of your total MBE score). Basically, the entire area of Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons is under-represented in the released NCBE questions (it is just 3% of the 1,600 NCBE questions, but expected to be 7% of your MBE score). To cite another example, the Rule of Perpetuities (from the Real Property subcategory of Special Problems) represents about 1% of the released NCBE questions, but on the upcoming exam, I expect this subcategory to test the Fair Housing Act (of which there are no released NCBE questions) rather than the Rule of Perpetuities. Thus, if your MBE study is based only on the law behind the released NCBE MBE questions, you will be under-prepared for some areas and over-prepared for others. Accordingly, you MUST use the UBE MASTER OUTLINE in tandem with these MBE rules. The UBE MASTER OUTLINE is designed to have 25 pages of black letter law per MBE subject with each page intended to represent 1 MBE question (e.g. for Criminal Law/Procedure, 12 of the 25 pages are on the Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons making it 7% of the UBE MASTER OUTLINE since it is expected to be 7% of your MBE score). Thus, the black letter law sections of the UBE MASTER OUTLINE will appropriately tell you what to expect on the upcoming exam (both contextually and proportionally), while the built-in MBE rules will tell you what was tested on the past. This is about as compete a picture as you can have of the current MBE exam. Furthermore, when you study based on the priorities, you will not be spending too much time on the past, nor too little time on the current. Basically, you should treat the UBE MASTER OUTLINE as your study bible. If there is something in the UBE MASTER OUTLINE that you don’t understand, you need to research it to understand it. If there is something in another outline that is not in my outline, forget about it.

My site is all about efficiency. For example, to do well on the MEE, you need to review the past MEE questions. On the subscription site are all the MEE questions sorted in order of priority with extraneous info removed from the answers to make your studying more efficient. If you don’t have the time to sit and read the full MEE questions, there are MP3s of the questions to listen to while you exercise/commute. If you don’t have the time for the full MP3s, there are partial abridged MEE questions. There is also an MEE issue spotting outline that contains only the MEE questions along with the issues and a brief answer explanation. If you don’t have the time for this, there is an MP3 of it that you can listen to. If you have no time for this, you can simply review the 1,200+ MEE issues that are built into my UBE MASTER OUTLINE that are sorted by category. So whether you have a lot of study time or very little study time, you will be able to find a way to study the things you need to study.

It is not easy to explain the subscription site in a simple email so I suggest you read this page if you haven’t already:
http://www.seperac.com/subscription.php

Will your subscription site help me as a part-time studier?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

As a part-time studier, you can still pass the exam, but you need to study as efficiently as possible. For example, one domestic educated examinee failed the exam 4 times (pre-UBE scores converted to UBE): F15 UBE 243 (MBE 118.7, MEE/MPT 125); J15 UBE 230 (MBE 117.6, MEE/MPT 115); F16 UBE 263 (MBE 138.1, MEE/MPT 132); and J16 UBE 248 (MBE 128.7, MEE/MPT 118.8). For his F17 attempt, the examinee was studying part-time. The examinee subscribed on 2/1/17 (21 days before the exam) because he felt he needed to study more efficiently. When I asked how long he studied for F17, he told me: “I would say 140 hours during the 21-22 days that I had.” After passing F17, the examinee told me: “I scored a 142.5 MBE and my total score was 275.  I am going to order my essay score breakdown and can send you that info when I receive it. I was really worried about the MBE and the 25 additional experimental questions.  I also knew I had missed three (3) fairly straight forward questions.  But I guess it turned out to be okay.   Doing practice questions from various sources really helped and I think Themis' questions were very good for me as I found them to be difficult. Your outlines really saved me though.  Without it, I would have failed.  Reviewing the MBE subject outlines was an excellent recap that last week I had.   Anyways, I am happy I will never study for this again.  Thanks Joe!!!!” Please note that this examinee followed my advice to focus on the MBE and yet he still scored better on the MEE/MPT (132.5) than on any of his prior full-time attempts.

Between 2015-2016, I communicated a good bit with the examinee and told him how important the MBE was. He understood this and even saw it firsthand – of his 4 failing attempts, the only time he had good essay scores was when he scored highest on the MBE (138 MBE in F16). When I asked him what he thought of his essays on that attempt, he told me: “According to my essay score breakdown, I scored an astonishing 67 on Essay 5 which was about trusts/essays.  I remember very clearly that I thought I had absolutely bombed this question.  I had no idea what the rules were, I did not know how to even conceptualize what was going on.  I know my answer was complete garbage.  Yet, I scored a 67?  Incredible.  My second highest score was a 58 and based on the essay content and questions, I'm also questioning how I got a 58 for that one. The crazy thing is that I was within 10 points of passing which meant they had to regrade my written exam (essays and mpt) and have it reread by the original graders....yet, I will received a 67...did they confuse my essays with someone else's? CRAZY.

Interestingly, when his MBE went down to 128 in J16, his essays also went down, even though it was the J16 UBE (where 4 of the 6 MEE questions were on MBE subjects). One would think that an examinee's essays/MPTs would improve with each attempt as the examinee builds on his knowledge and learns from his mistakes. However, it seems that essay/MPT scores wax and wane depending on the MBE score. The above highlights both the unfairness of the exam and also the importance of the MBE. This examinee passed the administration that he studied for the least. Meanwhile, other examinees study 2x or 3x more and somehow fail. However,  the commonality I always see is that a high MBE score almost always leads to a pass. Doing well on the MBE is partly a function of time – if you don’t have a lot of time to spend studying/practicing for it, it is hard to do well on it. Basically, an examinee needs to know/understand at least 400-500 legal principles to do well on the MBE because each question requires you to know multiple legal principles. For example, a single intentional torts MBE question may require you to know about assault, battery, false imprisonment and IIED. Thus, examinees with limited legal knowledge will not do as well as examinees with more extensive legal knowledge. Meanwhile, the MEE only consists of 20 legal principles (give or take a few). While a deeper understanding of the law is needed, it is MUCH easier for someone to get “lucky” on the MEE than the MBE. Let’s assume that like the MBE, you need 63% correct on the MEE to pass – this means you need to correctly identify/analyze about 13/20 of the major MEE issues. If you get lucky on just a few of them (i.e. what you studied the night before luckily appears), this can account for 10-15% of your total MEE score. Other times, examinees pick up extra points on the MEE by correctly “bluffing” an answer or two. Some examinees get lucky on the MEE by studying only for the MBE and then having MBE subjects appear on the MEE (e.g. on the J16 MEE, 4/6 questions were based on MBE subjects). However, for the MBE, you really can’t get lucky on it. For example, even if some of the concepts you studied just before the exam appeared, that will only help you with maybe 2-4 questions. That’s just 2% of your MBE score. Likewise, you can’t bluff an MBE answer because the exam is key-balanced so a guess will be correct only 25% of the time. For this and other reasons, I believe an examinee’s MBE score plays an important role in whether the examinee passes or fails the exam. Thus, if you plan to study for the MBE much less than other examinees, you really can't be inefficient in your studies. The subscription site centers around a simple premise – examinees that do well on the MBE generally pass. I provide advice on how to approach the exam more effectively along with helpful materials to achieve that goal. Thus, subscribers focus heavily on the MBE and take calculated risks with their MEE/MPT study based on the advice/materials on the subscription site. Whether the subscription site will improve your MBE enough to pass, I don’t know, but with a low MBE, most examinees will find it very difficult to pass the exam.

Everything I do on the subscription site is intended to make your studying more efficient so you can put more time into MBE study and practice (because it is seriously warranted). For example, part of doing well on the MEE involves reviewing the past MEE questions. On the subscription site, you can find all the released MEE questions sorted in order of priority with the extraneous answer information removed from the answers (about 10% of the answer) to make your MEE studying more efficient. If you don’t have the time to sit and read the full MEE questions, there are MP3s of the questions to listen to while you exercise/commute. If you don’t have the time for the full MP3s, there are partially abridged MEE questions. There is also an MEE issue spotting outline that contains only the MEE questions along with the issues and a brief answer explanation. If you don’t have the time for this, there is an MP3 of this Quick Review outline that you can listen to. If you don't have the time for this, you can simply review the 1,300+ MEE issues that are built into my UBE MASTER outline and sorted by category. So whether you have a lot of study time or very little study time, the materials/information on this site will enable you to find a way to study the things you need to study.

If examinees don’t have time to make use of the other materials on the site, you can focus on only the UBE MASTER outline and my MBE, MEE and MPT strategy pages (updated/released about one month before the exam). For example, the MEE issues in the UBE MASTER outline contain links to the published MEE essay questions, so in other words, when you click the issue link, you can instantly can see the "facts" (in the questions) related to the particular issues along with the answer explanations. This is a very helpful and efficient way to study – by reading my UBE MASTER outline, you have a complete set of information: the MBE/MEE black letter law, relevant hypotheticals, rules statements based on the 1,600+ released NCBE questions, the 1,300+ prior-tested MEE issues with the related facts and relevant answers and finally, topic summaries of those MEE answers for easier memorization/regurgitation.

Some part-time subscribers find the MBE Rules MP3s and the MBE Flashcard exams helpful. For example, in post-exam followups with subscribers, I ask them to specify any supplemental bar review materials, courses or tutors they used for the exam (e.g. Adaptibar, Bestmultis, Lean Sheets, Critical Pass Flashcards) and rank them in their order of effectiveness. A subscriber with an MBE score of 137.2 on the July 2016 UBE exam told me: “Seperac (quiz, mp3s, flashcards) Kaplan Mock Exams (too easy) Adaptibar (too simplistic) Critical Flashcards (better to do them alone)”

Can I use your materials even though I am currently enrolled in a bar review?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

An examinee emailed me the following in May 2017:

I found your site by mere coincidence on a Barbri v. Pieper blog. I must admit I am very intrigued by your SEPERAC method of Bar Prep. Currently, I am enrolled in Barbri Bar Prep. Today is actually Day 3, and already I have noticed that the classroom videos will not work for me because I find it more beneficial to watch the videos at my own pace, in order to grasp the material, take notes, and understand key concepts. So far I have been going to class only to come home to rewatch the videos, and take my own extensive notes. As a result, I am extremely sleep deprived and feel unproductive by going to class. Instead, when I get home I should be reviewing outlines and doing practice questions, not rewatching a video. Thus, Ive decided not to continue to go to the classroom videos, and instead watch on my own, still within the same schedule and in school because I like the accountability and discipline which that routine creates. Now, obviously I have some reservations, mainly I want to know if signing up for your Bar course is not recommended when a student is already taking another Bar Prep course such as Barbri. I think my main concern is whether I will have sufficient time to cover ideally both course materials (Barbri and yours) so that I can maximize my chances of passing. In other words, is you bar course supplemental or a full Bar course? And since you collect so much data, I guess a good way to answer this question is how previous students have done using both secular Bar course plus your bar course, and what was their opinion? Did they feel overwhelmed by the material? Where they able to cover at least 70% of both?

To answer the question, I reached out to a February 2017 subscriber who was enrolled in Barbri while also using my subscription site to prepare for the February 2017 UBE exam (he passed the February 2017 NY UBE exam with an MBE of 146.9 after failing the July 2016 NY UBE exam with an MBE of 136). The examinee’s response is below in bold.

I found your site by mere coincidence on a Barbri v. Pieper blog. Funny coincidence. I found Seperac the same way; one of those JD blog websites. So, I went through the same journey when I was researching bar prep courses. Be careful, the more you research and read comments, the more confusing it gets. I must have read (and written) hundreds of course comparisons and discussions. Unfortunately, it took me a while to finally realize the incredible value of Seperac’s website. The tips, tricks, research and conclusions you find in there you won’t find anywhere else. Not even in the lectures.

I must admit I am very intrigued by your SEPERAC method of Bar Prep. Currently, I am enrolled in Barbri Bar Prep. Today is actually Day 3, and already I have noticed that the classroom videos will not work for me because I find it more beneficial to watch the videos at my own pace, in order to grasp the material, take notes, and understand key concepts. I think it’s great you already know what type of learner you are. BTW, I watched Barbri’s lectures live too but from home. Good news is no distractions from other students. The bad news is you pause and break too much at home (unnecessarily) more than you should. As a result, your class goes from 3 hours to 4-5 hours all of the sudden. Was my biggest handicap. Later in the game, I found out listening to short MBE rules (Seperac’s mp3s) was more practical, more effective and less time consuming for me in terms of mastering the MBE part of the exam. Essentially it is cutting to the chase and simply master the most critical info required from you for the bar. On the other hand, with lectures, there is a lot of chit-chat going on which distract you from the real task at hand i.e. mastering the MBE.  

So far I have been going to class only to come home to rewatch the videos, and take my own extensive notes. Your method sounds like the Pieper method. The professor (I think a single guy gives all lectures/subjects) slowly dictates and students handwrite/type every single word and so forth. This is a monumental waste of time. You end up spending 2X than with a typical bar prep class such as Barbri (keep in mind it is already wasteful to sit for these classes). The big issue here is that such time is then taken away from your MBE practice (most powerful tool in your studies). So essentially, if you re-watch Barbri’s lectures, you are essentially spending the same amount of time as you would with Pieper but probably with worst results.

As a result, I am extremely sleep deprived and feel unproductive by going to class. Instead, when I get home I should be reviewing outlines and doing practice questions, not rewatching a video. You’re absolutely correct. Look, in terms of watching Barbri’s (or any other bar prep) lectures here’s my takeaway: unless the professor is super funny, likeable, eloquent, and extremely remarkable such as Prof. Franzese (Real Prop) or Prof. Freer (Civ Pro/Corps) and MAYBE Prof. Schechter (Torts), you will be wasting your time watching and re-watching videos. Full stop. Don’t gamble with your precious time by prioritizing these videos and taking notes like that. The first time I did that I absolutely regretted it. Later, I realized that the material would stick long-term more by reading/reviewing Seperac’s condensed outlines and/or MASTER docs (out loud as if you were the Professor). You end up re-writing those outlines in your style if you will, and in your own words. Sadly, if you were to watch the videos, there would be no time for that. Seperac’s outlines focus on the most important and nails it every single time. I found his predictions were astonishingly accurate. Better than any Professor’s gut feeling. I found that as one of the biggest advantages of having Seperac as my “insider guy” for the bar. I felt as if I was almost cheating or something!

Thus, Ive decided not to continue to go to the classroom videos, and instead watch on my own, still within the same schedule and in school because I like the accountability and discipline which that routine creates. Now, obviously I have some reservations, mainly I want to know if signing up for your Bar course is not recommended when a student is already taking another Bar Prep course such as Barbri. I think my main concern is whether I will have sufficient time to cover ideally both course materials (Barbri and yours) so that I can maximize my chances of passing. I see Seperac more like a holy grail of powerful Bar info, or as my “insider guy”, or as my “successful buddy who already passed the bar and has incredible tips, tricks and support for me before I go in and fully get immerse in the substantive studies and for later on whenever I need it”. Just to be clear, the first time I took the Bar and failed, my biggest mistake was to spend most of my time in class and taking notes. Then I found Seperac and followed his advice, realized about all the stupid mistakes I had made, and finally passed. Bottom line is I wish I had found Seperac much sooner.

In other words, is you bar course supplemental or a full Bar course? It’s both. Depending on how you decide to use it. I used it in a mixed fashion since I had Barbri’s textbooks, MBE practice questions, etc. For instance, instead of watching Barbri lectures (except the fun/remarkable ones as mentioned above) I used the Seperac’s mp3 materials (MBE Rules from previous exams, etc.). Instead of mastering the Conviser Mini Review I found more value in Seperac’s MASTER and MBE outlines because it is condensed and written in a certain way which makes it easier to read. You use Seperac’s website FIRST and as a priority because that time spent will save you time later. In other words, it will make you smarter and more efficient with your time allocation. So you get familiar with it and then you start attacking everything else, sort of following Barbri’s schedule in terms of when you review each subject, MBE questions, and so forth but all along hand in hand with your “insider buddy’s” overall guidance.

And since you collect so much data, I guess a good way to answer this question is how previous students have done using both secular Bar course plus your bar course, and what was their opinion? Did they feel overwhelmed by the material? Where they able to cover at least 70% of both? If you are studying full time and you decide to commit that much time to lectures, then I don’t see how one possibly could accomplish 70% for both. You have to get some quality sleep too! Specially with Barbri. All of those bar prep companies give you so much more non-essential stuff to do solely because they are charging you so much money for it. In other words, I guess that’s their way of giving you an “added value” Besides the app, MBE questions (not 100% of them though! watch out! Precisely from Seperac I learned this trick!), Conviser, etc., there is not much more juice to squeeze from it. They make it more complicated than it actually is! That’s why I decided to take the best out of each resource. From Seperac, I read the whole thing first, used it all along as a go-to guide (my Bar Bible), experimented with some tips and committed to what worked for me. Because of that, I was able to be more efficient with my time. That alone was a life saver for me.   

To cite another example. a repeater who subscribed in F17 and passed told me: “I have already cleared the rest of the exams, so I have to start the paperwork for the admission at the Bar. My total score was 289 and my MBE score was 144.0. I studied for the bar since December 2016, but I had failed the July exam for 0.5%!. I used Barbri as my main course preparation and very useful was the online tool they have to show you where you have to work more. That is how I connected your amazing package with my study. Wherever I would see that I need to work harder, I was studying your material and I was doing your Restatement questions, which are the closest anyone can find to the new bar exam we had on February. I also had access to many Themis and Kaplan tests, which despite being or because they were too different from what I had helped me to be more prepared for the actual exam. I also studied less the week of the exam and nothing the day before (imagine I had to travel from Athens, Greece to Bufallo NY!). I was doing almost 100 questions per day except one day which was free and another day when I was doing almost 200 questions. Essays I did used the Barbri material, but I had no time to do many essays, so I was reading the rest. Before I sleep, I was reading your outline to refresh my memory. Let me now if this was helpful. PS: I was swimming twice per week.”

How exactly does the UBE MASTER outline work?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

Basically, I dissect the exam for subscribers to save them a good deal of time in their studies. The UBE MASTER outline is an excellent representation of both the MBE and MEE. Aside from the black letter law sections that cover the material I expect to be tested on the upcoming exam, I also include the issues that were tested on every past released MBE and MEE exam (going back 20 years consisting of 1,600+ MBE issues and 1,300+ MEE issues). For example, doing well on the MBE involves knowing both the past MBE law tested and the current MBE law tested. The past law tested is represented in the released NCBE MBE questions. I added MBE rules for these released NCBE questions to my UBE MASTER outline so examinee can more efficiently review the law behind these questions (and see all the law together). For example, to answer and review these released NCBE questions would take about 200 hours (2 minutes per question to read , and 5 minutes per question to review the answer and make a rule) while listening to an MP3 of these rules available on the subscription site would take 10 hours. Furthermore, the MEE issues in the outline contain links to the published MEE essay questions, so in other words, when you click the issue link, you can instantly can see the "facts" (in the questions) related to the particular issues along with the answer explanations. This is a very helpful and efficient way to study – by reading my outline, you have a complete set of information: the MBE/MEE black letter law, relevant hypotheticals, rules statements based on the 1,600+ released NCBE questions, the 1,300+ prior-tested MEE issues with the related facts and relevant answers and finally, topic summaries of those MEE answers for easy memorization/regurgitation.

The MBE black letter law sections of this outline should be your bible – each of the 175 pages is expected to represent one of the MBE questions on the J17 MBE. For example, based on the NBCE Subject Matter outline, the subject of Real Property consists of five categories: (1) Ownership; (2) Rights in Land; (3) Contracts; (4) Mortgages; and (5) Titles. Each category is equally weighted, meaning each category will represent 20% of your Real Property MBE score. However, if you look at the MBE outlines of the big bar reviews, you would not see anything remotely close to these proportions. For example, 44% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 1 (Ownership) even though it is only 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Meanwhile, 7% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 3 (Contracts) even though it is 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Likewise, 8% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 4 (Mortgages) even though it is 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Kaplan and Themis are similar. For Kaplan, 45% of Kaplan's Real Property outline is based on category 1 (Ownership); 9% is based on category 3 (Contracts) and 9% is based on category 4 (Mortgages). For Themis, 36% of Themis' Real Property MBE outline is based on category 1 (Ownership); 9% is based on category 3 (Contracts) and 12% is based on category 4 (Mortgages). The average examinee gets about 18/25 correct on Real Property MBE questions. If you miss 50% of the category 3 (Contracts) and category 4 (Mortgages) MBE questions because your outline was 50% too small for those categories, that alone is about 5 MBE questions (which tranlates to 3-4 total UBE points). With my UBE MASTER outline, you won’t see such inefficiencies, except in rare cases (about 5% of the categories required more content than what proportionality dictated). My UBE MASTER outline covers the topics from the perspectives they will likely be tested on.

If you are reviewing a topic that you are familiar with (or it is designated low priority), there is less of a need to visit the hyperlinks to see how the issues were tested on the MEE. However, when you encounter a topic you are having trouble with (or it is designated high priority), the hyperlinks allow you to instantly see all the permutations of how that topic was tested in the past. Often, seeing the application of the law in the questions is far more helpful than reviewing the black letter law on its own. Examples are how you learn to better synthesize/analyze the law. My outline consists of thousands of of examples (from past MBE/MEE questions and others). Put simply, if an outline does not have good examples, it is not a good outline.

Following is the official explanation of the UBE MASTER outline contained in its Introduction section:

Using this outline is fairly intuitive, but if you want to fully understand its benefits, please continue reading this Introduction section. At a minimum, examinees should read about how to use the hyper-links because they enable you to utilize other resources to supplement your studies.

The Seperac UBE MASTER outline contains the following features:

The UBE MASTER outline is keyed to the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outline
Each year, NCBE provides a subject matter outline that indicates the MBE and MEE’s scope of coverage. According to NCBE, the test items for each MBE and MEE exam are developed from these categories. The UBE MASTER outline is specifically keyed to the most recent NCBE outline to cover all the items NCBE regards as testable. Both outlines share the same categorical divisions – the UBE MASTER outline contains 358 categories based on the ABC-level items in the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outline. Thus, you will be seeing the categories the same way NCBE wants you to see them.

By strictly adhering to the NCBE Subject Matter outline categorizations, the MBE content in the UBE MASTER outline is proportionally and contextually balanced. For example, based on the 2017 NBCE Subject Matter outline, the subject of Real Property consists of five categories: (1) Ownership; (2) Rights in Land; (3) Contracts; (4) Mortgages; and (5) Titles. Each category is equally weighted, meaning each category will represent 20% of your Real Property MBE score. However, if you look at the MBE outlines of the big bar reviews, you would not see anything remotely close to these proportions. For example, 44% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 1 (Ownership) even though it is only 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Meanwhile, 7% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 3 (Contracts) even though it is 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Likewise, 8% of Barbri's Real Property outline is based on category 4 (Mortgages) even though it is 20% of an examinee's MBE score. Kaplan is similar – 45% of Kaplan's Real Property outline is based on category 1 (Ownership); 9% is based on category 3 (Contracts) and 9% is based on category 4 (Mortgages).

In contrast, the UBE MASTER outline is designed to have 25 pages of black letter law per MBE subject with each page intended to represent 1 MBE question (e.g. for Criminal Law/Procedure, 12 of the 25 pages are on the Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons making it 7% of the UBE MASTER OUTLINE since it is expected to be 7% of your MBE score). Thus, the black letter law sections of the UBE MASTER OUTLINE will appropriately tell you what to expect on the upcoming exam (both contextually and proportionally), while the built-in MBE rules and MEE issues will tell you what was tested on the past. This is about as complete a picture as you can have of the current MBE exam. Furthermore, when you study based on the priorities, you will not be spending too much time on the past, or too little time on the current.

NOTE: Of the 168 MBE ABC categories in the UBE MASTER outline, about 5% of them are longer than their expected content based on my 175 MBE question/175 page methodology. It was necessary to do this to cover all the material that may be tested on the MBE for that ABC category.

The UBE MASTER outline is intended to be your MBE study bible
Examinees should treat the UBE MASTER outline as their personal MBE study bible. I strongly believe there is no better representation of the current MBE than this outline in as condensed a format. You should assume that each page of black letter law (which will sometimes span multiple pages depending on the number of corresponding MBE Rules/MEE issues) will represent 1 of the 175 graded questions you will see on the MBE. Thus, if there is a part of the outline you don’t understand pertaining to an MBE issue, you must review/research it to understand it. The MBE tests both past topics and new current topics and this outline is intended to help you with both. The past MBE topics are reflected in the built-in MBE rules (I wrote synopses of the law for each of the 1,600+ released NCBE questions – these are the same questions in Adaptibar/Strategies & Tactics, Barmax, etc.). The past topics and new current topics are reflected in the black letter law sections of the outline. I devote one page of black letter law (font size of 10 – feel free to increase it if you find it too small) to what I expect to represent one MBE question on the exam. Thus, there are approximately 175 pages of black letter law for the 7 MBE subjects, plus the built in MBE and MEE issues. The past topics and new current topics are also reflected in the built-in MEE issues (over past 400 MEE issues related to the 7 MBE subjects) because past MEE issues have been turned into MBE questions (especially with Civil Procedure). Accordingly, knowing the past tested MEE issues will help you on the MBE. Finally, the outline is highly prioritized. It is sorted by subject based on how much each subject is expected to contribute to your final score (both in context of the MBE and MEE). It is further prioritized by category so that you study the MEE topics expected to be repeated before you study any MEE topics not expected to be repeated. Put simply, the better you understand the MBE portion of this outline, the better you should score on the MBE and the more likely you will pass the exam.
One of the most important aspects of these outlines is the priorities. As I explain in detail below, the priorities enable examinees to study based on how much each category is expected to contribute to their score. If you are studying full time (8-9 hours per day for 6-7 days per week), then you should follow the study-time recommendations for each category (e.g. study 3x a week, 2x a week, 1x a week, 1x every two weeks, or 1x every month). If you are studying part-time (or you are using this material only to supplement your full-bar review), you should adjust the study-time proportionally. Studying this outline based on the assigned priorities should lead to the most efficient outcome on the upcoming UBE exam.

The UBE MASTER outline is a “dense” condensed outline. Due to the wide range of content that can be tested on the MBE and MEE, a denser outline is the more appropriate choice to study for upcoming exam issues. For example, a subscriber who scored a 174 on the MBE in NY and then a 177 on the MBE in NJ told me: “… as far as the MBE is concerned, your outlines have been most useful since you emphasize the fine distinctions.” Furthermore, I determined that there are fewer “repeat” topics on the MEE as compared to the pre-UBE essays, necessitating the need for a broader/denser overall outline. In categorizing every single topic tested on the MEE since 1995, I determined that out of the 798 individual topics tested on the past 44 MEE exams, 519 of these topics were tested just once (65%) while 279 of these topics were tested more than once (35%). I then broadened the scope by looking at the ABC Categories (there are 358 ABC categories based on the NCBE subject matter outlines). Out of the 358 ABC categories, 247 categories have been tested on the MEE since 1995, meaning 111 ABC categories have not been tested yet. In regards to the 247 ABC categories that have been tested, 61 of the categories have been tested only once (25%), while 186 of the categories have been tested more than once (75%). Thus, one is much better able to 'predict' what ABC categories will appear rather than individual topics. Put simply, if my outline was based solely on previously tested MEE topics (which is what the pre-unified MASTER outline did), it would directly cover only about 35% of an upcoming MEE exam (based only on specific topics).

The UBE MASTER outline is designed for combined MBE and MEE study

The MBE and MEE are too intertwined to be studied for separately. For example, MBE issues are tested on the MEE and MEE issues are tested on the MBE (especially for Civil Procedure). Furthermore, the MBE subjects often represent the majority of MEE questions. For example, on the July 2016 UBE exam, 68% of an examinee's MEE score (which is 30% of the total UBE score) came from MBE subjects (meaning 70% of an examinee’s total UBE score came from the 7 MBE subjects). On the Feb 2017 UBE exam, these percentages flip-flopped and 33% of an examinee's MEE score came from MBE subjects (meaning 60% of an examinee’s total UBE score came from the 7 MBE subjects). I expect NCBE’s testing of the MEE specific subjects on the MEE to wax and wane from exam to exam – on some exams a majority of the MEE will be based on the MEE specific subjects whereas other MEE exams will consist mainly of MBE subjects. However, to handle such a variance between exams, a unified MBE/MEE outline is necessary.  Thus, I merged all my individual outlines into a single outline – this UBE MASTER outline, and then appropriately prioritized it so that examinees study exactly how much each category is worth to their total UBE score. For each ABC category (169 MBE/MEE ABC categories and 189 MEE categories for a total of 358 different categories) contained in the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines, I outline what I regard as the relevant black letter law (along with hypotheticals and examples) followed by the relevant MBE rules and MEE issues for that category, along with a link to any MEE MASTER topic summaries.

If you attempt to study for the MEE using a separate outline, you are likely to duplicate your efforts and inefficiently over-study certain areas. The UBE MASTER outline enables you to study for both the MBE and the MEE at the same time by taking into account how much each category is expected to contribute to both your MBE score AND your MEE score. Combined study is also facilitated by the embedded MBE rules and MEE issues. As such, you will not only be able to know the importance of each of the 358 testable ABC categories, but you will also see exactly how the categories have been tested each time on the MEE/MBE over the past 20+ years (based on the released MBE and MEE questions). This helps examinees construct their MBE/MEE knowledge by not only reading/studying the relevant black letter law, but also efficiently seeing how it has been tested by NCBE. Examinees that have difficulty retaining the wide range of testable content can focus on the HIGH to MEDIUM priority topics which should represent 50%-70% of their total UBE score.

The more efficiently you study for the MBE/MEE portions of the exam, the more time you will have to divert to MBE practice. Examinees that do well on the MBE generally pass. Examinees that fail the exam usually did not do well on the MBE (almost always below the median MBE for the administration). Doing well on the MBE is partly a function of time – if you don’t have a lot of time to spend studying/practicing for it, it is hard to do well on it. While study for the other components of the exam can be “abbreviated” to some extent, MBE study really can’t be given short-shrift, nor can MBE answers be “bluffed” as with the MEE. The main purpose of this outline and relying on the priorities is to allow for abbreviated study so examinees are able to divert that extra time to MBE studying/practice.

Categorized and prioritized MBE rules for the 1,600+ released NCBE MBE questions from 1991 to present are built into the UBE MASTER outline

To do well on the MBE, examinees should first become familiar with the law tested on past MBE questions. If you have the time, you should answer and review the 1,600+ released NCBE questions (I discuss this in depth on the MBE Study page). Reviewing these 1,600+ released NCBE questions takes about 150-200 hours (assuming 1.8 minutes to read each question and 5 minutes to review each answer explanation and write a rule). For examinees that don’t have the time to do this (e.g. you are following your full bar review course syllabus and using their questions or you are studying part-time), I wrote rules for these 1,600+ questions (from the 1991 NCBE exams all the way up to the 2017 NCBE sample questions). A word document of these rules is 130 pages long. I also created a MBE Rules MP3 of these 1,600+ questions which is about 10 hours long. While it is always better to do the questions (to practice your reading comprehension and dealing with distractors), if you are short on time, this is an excellent alternative method to acquire the black letter law behind what NCBE has tested in the past in a very efficient way. More so, these rules are prioritized based on my priorities for the upcoming exam. Therefore, the rules are broken down into 36 ranked categories (representing the 36 MBE categories in the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines) to enable examinees to study the most important categories (that will contribute the most to the examinee’s MBE score) before studying the least important MBE categories. Thus, if you are very short on time, this is an excellent way to pick up the most important law in the least amount of time.

Please note that studying these rules is only one part of your overall MBE study. While the law behind past NCBE questions will give you insight into some of the legal concepts you can expect to see on the upcoming MBE, they are not always representative. For example, out of the 1,600+ released NCBE questions, there are only two questions on Double Jeopardy (1/10 of 1% of the questions). In contrast, Double Jeopardy is tested fairly frequently on the current MBE (I expect it to represent about 1% of your total MBE score). Basically, the entire area of Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons is under-represented in the released NCBE questions (it is just 3% of the 1,600 NCBE questions, but expected to be 7% of your MBE score). To cite another example, the Rule of Perpetuities (from the Real Property subcategory of Special Problems) represents about 1% of the released NCBE questions, but on the upcoming exam, I expect this subcategory to be tested substantially less. Thus, if your MBE study is based only on the law behind the released NCBE MBE questions, you will be under-prepared for some areas and over-prepared for others. Accordingly, subscribers must study the black-letter law in the UBE MASTER outline in tandem with these MBE rules. By seeing the rules associated with the black letter law, it will make it easier to understand the law (remember, knowledge is constructed).

The MBE rules are listed in order of importance. The OPE 1-4 rules (listed first) are the most important for you to know. For example, if you go to the section of the outline for Torts: Negligence: Standard of Care, you will see rules for the 37 standard of care questions tested on the released MBE questions from 1991-2017 sorted in order of importance. Thus, if you are very limited on time (let’s say because you put a lot of time into MBE practice), rather than studying all the rules separately, you can study them as you are studying the black letter law in the UBE MASTER outline, and you can further choose to focus on only the most important rules. As you answer MBE practice questions, you can also add your own rules to these sections to further enhance their understanding of each category. By maintaining all your rules in the UBE MASTER outline, you will have everything important contained in one single logical place.

Categorized and prioritized MEE issue statements for 400+ NCBE MEE issues from 2007 to present are built into the MBE sections of the UBE MASTER outline

In making the UBE MASTER outline (which involved examining every single MEE issue ever tested), I found that topics tested on the MEE that pertain to MBE subjects are also tested on the MBE. This makes sense, as NCBE probably uses MEE fact patterns to construct MBE questions and vice versa. This is especially true with the subject of Civil Procedure (which was added to the MBE in 2015) probably because NCBE needed to create a large pool of questions for the MBE so it likely went to the best source it had – prior MEE questions going back 44 MEE exams. As such, examinees should be looking at MEE issues when studying for the MBE and at MBE issues when studying for the MEE – this outline enables you to do so. You can also add notes in the boxes at the end of each category. This is a great place to put your MBE rules that pertain to that category or any MEE issues you encounter. Issue spotting is very important for the MEE, so you want to track this information to better help you on the exam.

Over 1,000+ hypotheticals and examples for the 7 MBE subjects are built into the UBE MASTER outline

Examinees learn by example. Accordingly, there are over 1,000 hypotheticals, tips and examples for the seven MBE subjects. The hypotheticals are detailed examples that are separately identified and appear in a yellow box with the prefix HYPO. The tips also appear in yellow boxes with the prefix TIP. The examples are less detailed parentheticals that start with (e.g.). Taking into account that the 1,600+ embedded MBE rules and 1,300+ MEE issues which also serve as examples, this UBE MASTER outline essentially contains almost 4,000 examples of the law to facilitate your understanding of it.

Drilling it down even further, I highlight what I regard as the topical areas of greater importance

For some categories, I highlight in yellow highlighting any topics or areas that I regard as more likely to be tested on the upcoming exam. This is based on my own personal opinion of which topics may be of greater importance (no statistical analysis is involved in this). I suggest you devote a little more time studying the highlighted areas as opposed to the non-highlighted areas, but you really should rely on the priorities contained in the outline topic headers more than the yellow highlighted areas.

Each MBE category is prioritized for the upcoming MBE

The UBE MASTER outline is sorted in order of subject priority. For example, an MBE subject that is not expected to contribute to your MEE score will appear lower in the outline than an MBE subject that is expected to contribute to your MEE score. Within these subjects, each ABC category is further prioritized. The MBE consists of 175 graded questions based on seven subjects (25 questions per subject). The MBE portion of the UBE MASTER outline consists of 169 MBE categories. However, while one would think that each category should reflect approximately one MBE question on the exam, they do not. In contrast, some categories will represent multiple MBE questions on the exam while other categories will represent no questions. Each category heading will tell you how many MBE questions you can expect on the exam based on the priorities of HIGH, MED and LOW. For example, if a category has an MBE-MEE priority of HIGH, this category is HIGH priority for both the MBE and MEE. If a category has an MBE-MEE priority of HIGH-MED, this category is HIGH priority for the MBE and MEDIUM priority for the MEE. A HIGH priority MBE category means that there will generally be 2 or more MBE questions from this category on the upcoming MBE exam. A MED priority MBE category means that there will generally be 1 or more MBE questions from this category. A LOW priority MBE category means there will be 0-1 MBE questions tested from this category on the upcoming MBE. Thus, if you are an examinee very limited on study time, you may wish to ignore the LOW priority MBE categories since those areas may or may not be tested on the upcoming MBE. Otherwise, you should simply study based on the study-time allocations.

Each MEE category is prioritized for the upcoming MEE

Everyone studies differently and certain study methods do not work for certain people. However, if you subscribed, you probably agree with the philosophy that you should study the MEE topics most likely to appear (and avoid the MEE topics least likely to appear) in order to increase your chances of passing the exam. In my analysis of bar exam essay topics over the past ten years, I have concluded that you cannot predict the essay topics for an upcoming exam – you can only assess topic priorities. The MASTER priorities use statistical analysis to determine which topics are not likely to appear on the upcoming exam. I strongly believe that this is the most efficient way an examinee can study for the bar exam. I put a good deal of time into determining the MASTER priorities for each exam – the priorities go far beyond simply looking at the frequency of appearance of a topic. For the MEE, a topic cannot appear on every exam and the MASTER priorities try to account for that. Since the entire MEE exam may consist of only 25 topics spread across 6 MEE questions, knowing just 4-5 more topics better than a typical examinee due to the MEE MASTER prioritizations can help you immensely on the exam.

Since examinees are taking a calculated risk by following these MEE priorities, I prepare a detailed post-exam analysis of MASTER for each administration it was used (16 administrations so far) to enable examinees (and myself) to better assess that risk. I also publish an even more detailed post-exam analysis on the subscription site after each exam. I know that many examinees rely on me to give them good information, so I regard it as bar review malpractice to not examine and report on the effectiveness of the information I provide:
http://seperac.com/bar/analysis.php

After I develop the statistical methodologies for the priorities, I test how these conditions would have worked on past exams. This “scenario testing” serves as a confirmation that the priorities are on point. If this was not the case, I would never release a prioritized list and tell examinees to rely on it. As stated above, I regard it as bar review malpractice to give advice to someone that requires them to take significant calculated risks in their studying unless it is strongly supported by the data. The priorities may sometimes seem illogical (i.e. a frequently appearing topic has a low priority or a rarely appearing topic has a high priority). However, every priority is based on a logical set of criteria to establish its priority. The determination of MASTER priorities is strictly formula based – I do not make any subjective assessments. Accordingly, the MASTER priorities are reactive – if the examiners modify how they select previously tested topics, the MASTER priorities change accordingly. Often, I am not even aware of the current priority of a specific topic since my opinion plays no role in the determination of the priorities. Even though the bar examiners may "shake things up" occasionally, there still needs to be an overall consistency to essay topic selection. Put simply, the more inconsistent the examiners are with essay topic selection, the less likely the exam will determine an applicant’s proficiency. For example, if a large number of obscure topics were tested, most examinees would do poorly on them, making it harder to distinguish applicants sufficiently to determine who is qualified versus unqualified.

Please keep in mind that the priorities in this UBE MASTER outline are specific to the JULY 2017 exam only. For example, if you test the priorities in the current MASTER against the immediately preceding bar exam, the priorities would be inaccurate. In the past, an average of 30% of the priorities change between each exam (in some cases, up to 50%). Thus, always rely on the topic’s priority rather than the topic's frequency of appearance.
Again, MASTER doesn't predict what topics will appear on the next exam - it simply prioritizes the topics to indicate which topics are not likely to appear. Studying based on these time allocations will not ensure that you will fully understand each category - the purpose of these time allocations is to ensure that you do not over-study a particular category. However, by studying based on these priorities, I strongly believe you put yourself in the best position to pass through proportionate learning. Once I determine how much something is worth towards your total score, that is how much study-time it warrants – any more than that and you are being inefficient. Inefficiency in studying is sometimes unavoidable, but I go to a lot of effort to make your studying as efficient as possible.

This outline contains navigation links and other layout designs to facilitate more effective studying and review.
The SEPERAC UBE MASTER OUTLINE is essentially comprised of three separate word documents. To utilize the links in the SEPERAC UBE MASTER OUTLINE, you must download all three files and keep them in the same directory. Do not rename the files (make sure they don’t get renamed by your device when you download them) or put them in different directories or the links won’t work:

SEPERAC-J17 EXAM-UBE MASTER OUTLINE – A 495 page outline containing black letter law outlines for the 14 MBE/MEE subjects that is keyed to the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines and broken down into 358 different categories. There are MBE/MEE priorities for each of the 358 testable categories. If the category has been tested on a released MBE or MEE exam, every associated MBE rule or MEE issue is reported after the black letter law section (based on 1,600+ MBE rules and 1,300+ MEE issues from the past 20+ years). The MEE issues section for each category also contains hyperlinks that will take you to the relevant MEE MASTER topic summaries for that category or to the MEE answer for that issue. This outline is fully up to date for the July 2017 exam, meaning it reflects the recent NCBE changes to Real Property topics and Evidence priorities.

SEPERAC-J17 EXAM-MEE MASTER-TOPIC SUMMARIES – A 200+ page outline containing prioritized summaries/synopses of the legal principles tested on the MEE exam since 1995. The topics are categorized based on the ABC subcategories contained in the NCBE Subject Matter outlines. The categories are sorted based on priority for the upcoming exam (highest priority first, then medium priority, then low priority). These generic paragraphs not only explain the relevant law, but can also be used to speed the writing process on the exam (even to bluff your way through parts of a question).

SEPERAC-J17 EXAM-MEE MASTER-RELEASED ANSWER COMPILATION – This Compilation outline (1,530 pages) is based on the last 45 MEE exams and contains 303 MEE questions. Each MEE question is followed by the NCBE Answer Analysis (and more recent questions also have the best examinee answers from other states). The MEE questions in this Compilation are grouped by priority (based on the SEPERAC MASTER priorities and other criteria) with the most important questions/answers first. The Compilation also identifies every single issue tested on every single essay – this can be used to check whether your issue-spotting is on point when you are outlining.
 
After this Introduction section, the next section is the Table of Contents. The Table of Contents is Hyper-Linked, meaning that if you hold down the CTRL key and click on a category, you will jump to that category. In addition, each of the categories tested on the MEE is hyper-linked to the SEPERAC MEE MASTER TOPIC SUMMARIES document while every MEE issue is hyper-linked to the SEPERAC MEE MASTER RELEASED ANSWER COMPILATION so that you can quickly see how the topic was answered in each exam where the topic appeared. You can also jump around the outline using the Word Navigation Pane (go to View, and then mark the check box to show the “Navigation Pane” or “Document Map”). Utilizing the hyperlinked Table of Contents or Microsoft Word’s Navigation Pane, you can essentially jump to any subject, question or answer instantly. Furthermore, you can use the table of contents as a checklist of the issues related to each category.

For each category in the SEPERAC UBE MASTER OUTLINE, the first section is the black letter law section that examinees should strive to memorize. Each category header reports a priority of LOW, MED, or HIGH. The headers are color-coded based on their priority: BLUE=HIGH PRIORITY, GREEN=MEDIUM PRIORITY and ORANGE=LOW PRIORITY (you can read more about the prioritization rationale and methodology on the subscription site). Each category priority tells you how often the category should be studied. If you are studying full time and using this material as your primary source of study, you should follow these priorities religiously.

For the 169 MBE categories, the next section is the MBE rule section. For each released NCBE MBE question from 1991 to present that was tested on that category, there is an MBE rule I wrote that synopsizes the legal issue being tested in that question. For example, the heading for the rule section may appear as follows:

MBE Issues Tested on Jurisdiction – Federal SMJ

There are 1600+ MBE rules in the UBE MASTER outline encompassing the 1991, 1992, 1998 MBE exam books, the OPE 1-4 questions and other sample questions. If you are limited in MBE practice time, studying these rules is a great way to pick up the legal knowledge without having to go through the trouble of answering these questions. Since the older MBE questions are more straight-forward than the current MBE questions, you really don’t need to answer these questions from a practice point of view, but you still want to know the laws tested because this is what NCBE regards as important.

Next, for the MBE/MEE categories that have been tested on the MEE, there is an MEE Issues Tested section. The header for the section appears as follow:

MEE Topic Summaries: Jurisdiction – Federal SMJ

These headings are hyperlinked. This means if you press CTRL and click on the link, you will be taken to the appropriate topic summary in the SEPERAC MEE MASTER TOPIC SUMMARIES document. You should click on these links if you are still have problems understanding a category (especially a HIGH priority category) and when you need to begin studying for the MEE. If you still don’t understand something after reading the MEE MASTER topic summaries, you can read the issue links below the topic heading to see how the topic was tested since 1995 (and the outcome). If this still doesn’t explain the topic to you, you can click on any of the issue links to take you to the exact part of the essay answer where the issue is explained. The hyperlinks to the MEE answers are available to give you insight into the analysis involved with each question (what facts are used and discussed).

For the MEE, issue spotting is paramount, so either read/study the MEE issues built into the UBE MASTER outline or use the MEE Quick Review outline (if you don't have the time for the full MEE questions and Answer Analyses or the full MP3s). In writing bar exam essays, knowing the black letter law is not enough – you also need to know how it is applied. The UBE MASTER outline lets you do a full review of the MEE quickly and efficiently by seeing the black letter law together with the tested issues. Furthermore, knowing how the issue was tested helps immensely in issue spotting. It is this type of efficiency that enables examinees to accomplish essay study sooner and devote that saved time to the MBE.

The issues are color coded, so you know the result after you read the issue question. This color coding is designed to enable you to study more efficiently by seeing the answer in color. If the answer to the issue is in the Affirmative, the answer appears in GREEN. If the answer to the issue is in the Negative, the answer appears in RED. If the answer to the issue is neutral or cannot be answered definitively, the answer appears in BLUE. To go to the full MEE answer, simply press the CTRL key and click on the hyperlinked issue prefix (e.g. 2015-FEB-Q1-P1). There are hyper-links for all 1,271 issues tested on the MEE since 1995. Whether you click on a link (to read the essay answer in the SEPERAC MEE MASTER RELEASED ANSWER COMPILATION document) should depend on the point value of the issue. For example, if the point value of the issue is below 25% (this percentage appears after the hyperlinked issue prefix), then there is less of a need to look at the corresponding essay answer. However, the higher the point value of the topic, the more often you should review the issue answers by clicking on the issue links.

According to NCBE’s MEE Instructions, on the MEE you must: “[d]emonstrate your ability to reason and analyze. Each of your answers should show an understanding of the facts, a recognition of the issues included, a knowledge of the applicable principles of law, and the reasoning by which you arrive at your conclusions. The value of your answer depends not as much upon your conclusions as upon the presence and quality of the elements mentioned above.” This unified UBE MASTER outline is specifically designed to help you with each of these elements of a good MEE answer.

Your ability to “show an understanding of the facts” will be developed through reading the MEE answers and seeing how the facts were discussed. You will be able to do this efficiently because hyperlinks to the specific MEE questions are built into the SEPERAC UBE MASTER OUTLINE. Through the MASTER priorities (contained in all three documents), you will learn these questions on a prioritized basis – the facts most likely to re-appear are designated as such. There is no guess-work involved here – start with the first essay and work your way down.

Your ability to “[recognize] the issues” will be developed by reading the issue links and understanding how the issues have been presented for each topic in past MEE questions. One of the significant benefits of UBE MASTER are the embedded MBE rules and MEE issue links. There is no other available bar exam resource that takes every released MBE and MEE issue and groups the issues based on the legal principle of law being tested in the issue. This enables an examinee to quickly see how the issue was brought up in the past questions, so the examinee will be prepared to identify the issue in future questions.

Your ability to demonstrate a “knowledge of the applicable principles of law” will be developed by studying UBE MASTER based on priority, thereby being very familiar with the principles of law most likely to appear and least familiar with the principles of law least likely to appear. In addition, the MEE MASTER answer summaries are more comprehensive than just the black letter law. Where possible, I also explain the purpose of the law. As such, when you write your response, you can illustrate to the grader that you not only know the black letter law, but that you also understand it.

Finally, you will “[d]emonstrate your ability to reason and analyze” by reviewing the NCBE Answer Analyses which do an excellent job of showing how to analyze an MEE essay. In addition, the best examinee answers from other states serve as good examples of proper reasoning and analysis. By analyzing representative good answers, examinees will learn to write passing MEE essays by example. These best examinee answers provide insight as to what type of writing and how much knowledge and analysis is required for an above average score that is not at the level of the released NCBE Answer Analyses. I regard the process of reviewing the past MEE essays (and their associated issues) as very important. Much like the recently released MBE questions (OPE 1-4) reflect the current MBE, the recently released MEE questions reflect the current MEE. Since the cost to purchase the 2012-2017 MEEs from NCBE is $150, unless an examinee obtains these questions from their bar review, a number of examinees will be unfamiliar with them, giving you an advantage on the MEE. Reading, listening to, outlining, and answering these MEE essays will teach you how to compose an MEE answer that the bar examiners are looking for.

This outline is editable to facilitate more effective studying and review.
I release the UBE MASTER outline as an editable word document to allow examinees to supplement it. For example, you can add your own pieces of law, highlight areas you need to study better, or even add your own MBE rules in the MBE rule section for each ABC category. Accordingly, you may decide to copy your MBE rules into this outline (by adding them to the existing rules) rather than using a separate MBE Rules outline. If you plan to edit the documents, I suggest that you “Track Changes” in the documents so that you can see easily identify your additions and changes.

As subscriber, you are agreeing to the Purchase Agreement. Therefore, you cannot share/sell/disseminate the subscription site materials or advice without my written consent. I sincerely believe that if you use these materials as directed, you will improve your odds of passing the bar exam. However, the more examinees that use these materials, the lower everyone's chances of passing. By keeping subscriptions limited to a small percentage of examinees, there is also less incentive for the bar examiners to purposefully change the exam to counter topic priorities when only a small number of examinees are relying on them, especially when deliberately changing their exam methodology may have unintended consequences on the majority of examinees who are unaware of the priorities (e.g. adding more low priority topics could cause examinees who normally would pass to fail).

If an examinee shares the material or information on this subscription site, they are doing it to their detriment. Examinees must recognize that all the information on the subscription site is designed to increase your probability of passing the exam, so sharing that information with anyone decreases that probability. Thanks to the internet, sharing this material/information with just one person can have the unintended effect of it being subsequently shared with hundreds of examinees who are all competing for the same license. Examinees must keep in mind that licensure exams act as a form of economic protectionism since a bar exam "passing score" arbitrarily sets a limit on the number of attorneys licensed in a jurisdiction. An examinee that scores a 264 on the New York UBE exam is probably just as qualified to practice law as an examinee who scores a 266, but only one of these examinees will be admitted to the bar. Put simply, if the seven current justices of the New York Court of Appeals were the only persons to sit for the upcoming New York UBE exam, at least two of the justices would fail the exam based on the cut score (and probably more due to a poor MBE showing).

Does the full subscription include the MEE study module, with the MEEs from 95-17 Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

Yes, the full subscription contains all the modules listed on the Subscription page. This means you have access to everything mentioned on the Subscription page, including the MEE and MPT Comparisons (these are the banks of graded examinee essays that can be compared) and the MBE, MEE and MPT Strategy pages (which are usually updated and made available about one month before the exam). In regards to the individual modules, at the moment, only the MEE Study module is available, but I will be adding some of the other modules (e.g. the MPT Study Module) as time permits. The difficulty with adding the individual modules is that the information/materials needs to be modified to be able to stand-alone as a module (at the moment, all the modules are somewhat intertwined because the subscription site was written without modules in mind).

Do you have a bank of graded essays/MPTs? Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

Yes, the full subscription contains a large bank of graded essays/MPTs called the MEE and MPT Comparisons. Subscribers to the MEE Study Module can access the MEE Comparison. These Comparisons of graded examinee essays/MPTs are accessible by subscribers or non-subscribers who submit their essays to me for that exam. For the MPT, I have over 500 graded MPTs going back for 15 exams (this is super helpful to see how a good MPT is constructed). For the UBE, I currently only have J16 MEE essays from about 40 examinees (will be adding F17 MEE essays in June 2017). This is how it works:

1) If you fail the UBE exam and have a copy of your essays, you email them to me.
2) I transcribe your essays and statistically analyze them.
3) Once I have a large enough sample of essays (usually 20-30 examinees for a February exam or 50-60 examinees for a July exam), I create the MEE/MPT Analysis for that exam.
4) I then email you a free 37+ page essay analysis that statistically compares your MEE/MPT answers to everyone else who sent me their essays. A sample of the J16 Analysis (37 pages) is here:
http://www.seperac.com/pdf/Sample-Essay-MPT%20Analysis-July%202016.pdf
This MEE/MPT Analysis is confidential – I don't share your essays with anyone and no one else sees them. All I do is transcribe your essays and make the report once I have a large enough sample. NOTE: I plan to start comparing the MEE essays to the point sheets so the MEE section of the analysis will be similar to the MPT section of the analysis, giving you even more insight into your MEE/MPT answers.
5) When I send you the MEE/MPT Analysis, I ask you if you want to participate in the MEE/MPT Comparison. If you say No, nothing else happens with your essays and no one ever sees them except me. If you say Yes, I include your essays in the MEE/MPT Comparison which lets you see your answers compared to everyone else's side-by-side. Following are very small samples of my February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/
This Comparison is viewable by everyone who participates in it and also by subscribers. In the Comparison, everything is redacted (I even check your MPTs to make sure you didn't mention your name by mistake) so there is nothing to identify you. The majority of examinees decide to participate once they see their Analysis (out of the 500+ examinees that have sent me their essays for the Analysis, only 7 have opted out of the Comparison). I have been doing these Comparisons since 2010 and never has an examinee told me their confidentiality was compromised in any way.
6) If you participate in the Comparison, I give you a $40 coupon code if you decide to later subscribe to the full subscription site (where you can view the Comparisons for other exams) or refund $40 if you are already subscribed.

Both the Analysis and the Comparison are great ways to get some useful insights into your MEEs/MPTs. For example, one of the more useful aspects of the MEE/MPT Analysis is a “Top 20 Words” analysis that reports the top 20 words the above average answers used that you did not. Through this “Top 20 Words” list, I find that failing examinees sometimes fail to use IRAC phrases such as “whether”, “here”, “therefore”, or “however.” This tells me the examinee’s essay is probably not as organized as it could be. Other times the examinees fail to use analysis words such as “because”, “since” , or “as.” In an IRAC analysis, “because” is the single most important word to use when analyzing the facts in the question. The failure to use words such as "because", "since" and "as" will negatively affect the analysis portion of your essay and can only hurt your score. Lastly, examinees often fail to use the legal terminology associated with a particular essay topic. I refer to these terms as “buzz-words.” I believe that graders do not spend a lot of time reviewing an essay, so the failure to use buzz-words (to signal to the grader that you understand the topic) can hurt your essay score. Put simply, absence of such words indicates the examinee may not be discussing things he/she needs to discuss.

The MEE/MPT Comparison is a fantastic way to visually identify what you did wrong on the MEE/MPT by looking at your essays side by side against others. You can look at exactly passing answers to see how much (or how little) is required for an exactly passing score. When you look at the text comparison, you start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. The PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side) let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers). For example, one examinee (non-subscriber) who failed F15 told me: "I did much better on my essays this time due in large part to your comparison tool. I found that to be extremely helpful." For the F15 exam, this examinee's 5-Essay average was 53.74 (a passing essay average for the Feb 2015 exam was 51.43). Based on 196 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 9/196 (this means the examinee had a 5-Essay average better than 95.4% of the examinees that sent me their Feb 2015 score information). In July 2014, this examinee had a 5-Essay average was 45.22 (a passing essay average for the July 2014 exam was 47.83). Based on 315 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 131/315 (which was better than 58.4% of the examinees that sent me their July 2014 scores).

Thus, with the MEE/MPT Analysis you can statistically compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs while with the MEE/MPT Comparison, you can visually compare your MEEs/MPTs to other graded MEEs/MPTs. On the subscription site, I have Comparisons for the last 15 MPT exams but only the J16 MEE since NY only switched in J16 (F17 to follow soon). For example, with the July 2015 MPT Comparison (Opinion Letter), you can examine 63 graded MPTs (for a total of 1,800+ comparisons). For the July 2016 MEE Comparison, for each of the six MEE questions, there are 741 comparisons based on 33 examinee essays.

Is a subscription helpful for any UBE state. Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

I realize your subscription is geared towards the NY bar exam, but is it helpful for any UBE state? I'm mostly interested in general legal principles for studying.


My site is geared for the NY UBE exam, but since the UBE is a uniform exam, all the information/materials are applicable to UBE examinees in other states. If I calculate scaling or mention statistics, they are usually pertaining to New York, although this is changing as I am now starting to receive scores and essays from examinees in other UBE states. However, even when I refer to NY statistics, they are usually relatable to other states. For example, although UBE Score Estimator is primarily based on New York bar examinee statistics, a lot of non-New York UBE examinees told me it accurately predicted their results.

I am sitting for the MEE and MPT only - what do you suggest?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

As to materials, my advice would be the Barbri Conviser for the UBE and to supplement it with my MEE Study module ($99). The MEE Study module is intended to supplement an examinee’s MEE study, but it is not intended for complete MEE study (which is why I also suggest the Conviser). For example, if an examinee wants to listen to the past MEE exams, I have MP3s for the past 20 MEE exams, or if an examinee wants to practice issue-spotting past MEE questions, I designed an outline (MEE Quick Review) for that. My MEE study module contains every released MEE (from 1995 to present). In contrast, if you planned to buy the MEEs from NCBE, the 2012-2017 MEEs would cost $150. The recent MEEs are useful because much like the OPE exams are a good reflection of the current MBE, the recent MEEs are a good reflection of the current MEE. I make the past MEEs even more useful/efficient by creating MP3s and an MEE issue spotting outline. Also, there is also a bank of graded MEE essays (I refer to it as the MEE Comparison) that will include examinee answers from the J16 and F17 MEE. For the July 2016 exam, for each MEE essay, there are 741 comparisons based on 33 examinee essays and four released above average answers (two from New York, one from Minnesota and one from Arkansas), plus the NCBE Answer Analysis. Thus, you can view poor essays, exactly passing essays, or high scoring essays, and compare any essay to another side by side. I feel this analysis is invaluable for examinees to quickly and efficiently discover "what works" versus "what doesn't work" on the MEE. For example, an examinee that recently passed told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” I like to think of MEE materials as gap-fillers that dove-tail with the big bar review materials. I discuss everything more in depth here.

For example, a F17 subscriber to the MEE Study Module who passed with an MBE score of 136 and a total UBE score of 290 told me: “I took the NJ and NY bar exams in 2012. I passed NJ on the first try and failed NY. This was my 3rd attempt at NY (though a different exam) and I finally passed! I used Adaptibar to study for the MBE as well as some outlines a friend sent me, your materials to study for the MEE, and a Rigos book to study for the MPT. I did about 1600-1700 MBE questions total (all adaptibar). In the beginning, I was scoring about 55% correct and towards the end I was scoring between 65-70% correct. I started studying December 1st before the exam and probably spent about 65% of the time focused on the MBE. I amped up my MEE practice towards the end and wrote out about 3 MPTs while timed. I reviewed a few more MPTs just to get a sense of structure and detail needed. I was working full-time and my goal was to study 4-6 hours per day (the 8 hours reccomended by Barbri was just not realistic for me). I was very focused during those 4-6 hours and did not waste time on facebook, etc. I attribute my passing to 2 things: (1) I entered the study period from a place of maturity and far less anxiety (I was able to remind myself that I'm already a lawyer and I also told very few people I was taking the exam.....so social external stress was mostly eliminated) and (2) I focused my studies and practice on the ACTUAL exam. I briefly reviewed the materials but did not waste hours of time watching videos or outlining (eventually I did supplement the outlines I had)....but my studying was spent going over ACTUAL MBE questions and ACTUAL MEE questions, coupled with reviewing the previously tested law as applied to the facts. For me, I found that seeing the application of the law in the questions was far more helpful than reviewing the black letter law on its own. In the past, timing was always a problem for me on the MBE. The first time I took the exam I didn't even finish the MBE (I had 5 questions left and just bubbled the answers in randomly). In the February exam I had 15 extra minutes for the morning section and just enough time for the afternoon section. Additionally, I did minimal MPT practice in my previous attempts, if any. I realized early that each MPT is worth 10% (far more than any MEE essay) and got a sense of how to budget my time and how to assure that I included all necessary details ... I found the MEE Module to be super helpful - the sheer repetition of reviewing the law applied to the facts with analysis helped me figure out how to structure essays, the detail needed in analysis, and what the right answers were.  I went through so many essays.....I think the only downside was feeling overwhelmed by so much material (which isn't really a downside) … The MEE Quick Review outline was helpful for identifying issues and did not take a significant amount of time, allowing me to study simultaneusly for the MBE.

Following is the advice I give to subscribers on how to use the MEE Study Module:

Examinees can utilize the materials on this site as they wish, but I suggest that examinees begin with the MEE Quick Review outline to get better at MEE issue spotting. You should read a question, write down the issues you come up with, and then check your answers. The Reviewing/Outlining Released MEE Essays section explains how to do this. Then repeat for at least 100 questions. If you are limited on time or you are an auditory learner, use the MP3s of the Quick Review outline instead. Next, if you commute/work out (or just get sick of reading), listen to the MP3s based on full MEE Exams. Start with the 2015 MEEs (yes, that is correct - the 2016 to 2017 MEEs are lower priority) and work your way back. Here you can study more passively by listening (which will form different memory impressions to aid in recollection), but also try to occasionally actively study by trying to issue-spot in your head after you listen to a question. If you are are having difficulty with an issue, use the MEE Essay Compilation to research it (the questions are sorted by subject) to see how it has been tested in past exams. Reviewing the full NCBE Answers will improve your MEE analysis ability. Next, review the MEE Essay Comparison to better understand how actual MEE answers are scored (while Model Answers are great to learn from, they are unrealistic examples of typical examinee answers). You should compare high-scoring MEEs to one another, look at exactly passing answers and also look at the really low scoring answers (as examples of what not to do). When you look at the text comparison, you will start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. The PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side) let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers). Before you begin answering MEEs in practice, read the Grading your practice MEE answers section. Finally, about a week before the exam, download and start reviewing the MEE Buzzwords document. As simplistic as it may seem, using the appropriate terminology in your answers is important to your MEE score.

I plan to have an MPT module available in a few weeks. It has materials for the MPT, solid MPT advice and an MPT Comparison containing over 500 graded MPTs covering the last 15 MPTs (this is a fantastic resource).

I am taking the exam in 2018. Can I subscribe now?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

If you are sitting for the February 2018 exam, the earliest you can subscribe is August 2017. If you enter your name and email on the below Email Notification List, I will notfiy you when enrollment opens and when the next UBE MASTER outline is released. In the meantime, spend at least one hour a day on MBE review/practice until you subscribe. According to NCBE, "the MBE measures analytical skills and the grasp of fundamental legal concepts reliably and efficiently. These skills and this knowledge will continue to be the stock-in-trade for every practicing lawyer, regardless of area or type of practice; they are the foundation without which a lawyer cannot demonstrate other skills or competencies." Do 10 questions in 18 minutes and then spend the rest of the hour reviewing the answers and updating your rules outline. There is no need to study a particular subject or topic - simply do ten different questions per day. Reviewing MBE questions now in a more relaxed atmosphere (no study pressure or time constraints) should make the questions more familiar and less intimidating. At this early juncture, you want to focus on quality rather than quantity. Make a rule for every question you do (both the questions you answer correctly and incorrectly). Typically, I advise examinees to make MBE rules for questions they answer incorrectly, or correctly for the wrong reasons. However, since you will be taking the exam a while from now, it is essential to take good notes and maintain an MBE rules outline to help you recall later what you study now. Doing MBE questions now without maintaining an MBE rules outline for every single question is essentially a waste of your time. Make sure to examine your answers. Really try to understand why an answer is wrong and take the time to research it (you won’t have the luxury of seriously researching topics as you get closer to the exam). An examinee who recently passed explained the process fairly well: “I would dissect those MBE questions over and over again, regardless of whether I got them wrong or right.

Keep track of the MBE questions you answer and your answer choices on a separate piece of paper or spread-sheet. Examinees should independently keep track of their MBE practice answers so that they can re-test themselves later. If you don't re-test yourself once you have learned the right answer (and reminded yourself through making a rule/flashcard and studying it), you will often repeat your mistakes. For example, in a 1998 study, NCBE found that examinees generally do not learn from their MBE mistakes - repeat examinees generally did not improve on questions they previously answered on an earlier MBE exam. To counter this problem, examinees can improve their understanding of unfamiliar law by making rules (which requires you to think about the law), studying the rules, adding to them after additional MBE practice, organizing them, and then studying them again. This means that you should not mark up your MBE books, but write your answers on blank scoresheets or in a spreadsheet (such as the MBE Study Spreadsheet on the subscription site). Then, every so often, answer a sample of 10 previously answered questions. How you do when re-answering these questions will give you a good bit of insight as to whether you are have learned the law for these questions. If you tracked your old answer choice, you can also see if you are choosing the same incorrect answer or a different answer. If you cannot answer 8/10 correctly, you need to spend more time making/studying your rules because there is a failing somewhere. Put simply, if you can't get at least 80% correct on familiar questions you answered and reviewed a few weeks earlier, it will be even harder for you testing on the unfamiliar questions you will encounter on the MBE.

To further diversify your MBE practice (without having to buy anything), BARBRI offers a free 100 question MBE Preview Diagnostic Exam which contains the proper exam distribution of questions (including Civil Procedure). To download these BARBRI MBE Preview questions, click here:
http://esc.barbri.com/viewFile.html?id=0adf50e0-ce68-471d-92b9-f4deddee690f&mimeType=application/pdf

The answers can be downloaded here:
http://esc.barbri.com/viewFile.html?id=8d3fe88b-ae6a-4870-8539-beb87a3836f3&mimeType=application/pdf

Pieper also offers a free “MBE question of the day” that is emailed to you daily:
http://info.pieperbar.com/bar-exam-questions

Always try to mix up your MBE practice – it is what high scoring MBE examinees generally do.

Everything you need for the MEE and MPT is on my subscription site. There is specific advice about MPT studying on the subscription site that ties in with the MBE and MEE advice that I give.

For the MEE, you can also review older MEEs and answer analyses here:
http://www.ncbex.org/exams/mee/preparing/

For the MPT, you can review older MPTs and point sheets here:
http://www.ncbex.org/about-ncbe-exams/mpt/preparing-for-the-mpt/

The point sheets are helpful in understanding what the grader is looking for.

Your goal at this early juncture is to dissect the exam. You will not do any serious memorization. You will simply (1) examine (2) try to understand; and then (3) take very detailed notes that you will review weekly.

Do I need to submit my UBE application receipt to purchase the MEE Study Module?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

No. Examinees do not need to submit anything to me in order to purchase the MEE Study Module. Examinees can likewise subscribe to the full subscription site without having to submit their UBE application receipt. However, if you subscribe to the full subscription site and do not submit your UBE application receipt to me (to confirm that you are an examinee taking the upcoming UBE exam), then you will NOT be able to access the current UBE MASTER outline (although you can access the UBE MASTER outline for the prior exam).

Do you grade essays/MPTs?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

No, I currently don’t grade essays/MPTs but I am working on an automated way to calculate a fairly accurate MEE/MPT score (check back in about six months). In looking at thousands of graded essays and guessing their score, I am wrong more than I am right. Thus, while Joe Seperac’s subjective opinion of your essay might be a little better than Joe Schmoe’s, it’s still just a single subjective opinion. However, when I statistically analyze an essay answer, I am better able to say what score it deserves (although there is never a guarantee it will receive that score). This is the unavoidable unreliability of essay grading. According to NCBE, the reliability of the MBE scaled score is 0.90. NCBE found that for the essays to have a reliability of 0.90, they needed to be 16 hours long with 32 different essay questions. NCBE found that for the MPT to have a reliability of 0.90, it needed to be 33 hours long with 22 different MPT items. see The Bar Examiner: Volume 77, Number 3, August 2008. Unreliability in essay scoring means that you can have a very high essay score on one exam and then a very low essay score on another exam even though your level of knowledge has not changed (or even improved). Thus, answering only 6 essays and 2 MPTs make unreliability in essay scoring guaranteed. Unreliability in high-stakes exams makes it harder to distinguish applicants sufficiently to determine who is qualified versus unqualified (which is why the written scores are scaled to the MBE).

So how does unreliability in essay scoring occur? Let me give you an example. Take a look at the following essay grading analysis I made of a sample of J14 essays. You will need to Zoom in on this PDF to read the material (I try to put a number of essays on one page so it can be visually compared).
http://seperac.com/pdf/J14-Essay%20Analysis-Exam%20Scoring-Essay%201.pdf

This PDF is a small sample of 15 answers from Essay 1 from the July 2014 exam. It contains obvious and serious mistakes in grading. As part of an essay analysis I conducted on the pre-UBE essays, I tried to determine the weight of each issue and calculate each examinee’s score for each issue (for example, PROF-RES: Solicitation/Referral Fees (Seperac Est. score of 2/10)). The final result was the “Seperac Estimated Score.” Bar graders have neither the time or the interest in putting similarly scored essays side by side to see if the grading is indeed accurate. However, when you do this, grading inaccuracies often come to light. For example, if you look at the 5th essay (Jul2014-Essay-001-ID 002-Typed-Score 38.66), this “Examinee J” received a score of 38.66. If you compare this essay to the other essays that scored around 38.66, you will see that this essay is far superior. I feel this essay score was severely discounted – just compare this essay to the released Model Answers and you will see what I mean. How this essay is not a passing essay is a complete mystery to me. Now let’s suppose that you studied heavily for this exam and put effort into the essays and you were the examinee that wrote the above essay in question. You would have written what was objectively a good essay that should have been well above passing, but instead would have received a terrible score. This is what no one can assess – the unreliability of subjective essay grading.

Luckily, the MEE questions are less prone to such unreliability because they are shorter and there is a grading rubric. Thus, if you have the released MEE questions, you can essentially grade yourself by comparing your answers to the NCBE answer analyses. According to the maker of the MEE: “NCBE’s grader training and materials also assign weights to subparts in a question. So an examinee who performs well on one subpart of an MEE question worth 25% of the total score that could be awarded for that question is not assured a 6 unless he performs well on the other parts of the question, too, in comparison with other examinees. In other words, there is a weighting framework for assigning points, which helps to keep graders calibrated and consistent.” see the March 2015 NCBE Testing Column: Judith A. Gundersen, The Testing Column, Essay Grading Fundamentals, The Bar Examiner (March 2015). This differs from pre-UBE essay grading where it appeared the graders reviewed the essays more holistically (i.e. looking at the overall answer and then assigning a score). On the MEE, the graders are somewhat constrained by the grading weights, meaning that a well written answer with good reasoning that misses issues will probably score lower than a poorly written answer with basic analysis that correctly identifies all the issues.

Since the graders are referring to a point-sheet, I believe issue-spotting is paramount on the MEE. Basically, if what you say is not on the grader’s checklist, you are not supposed to earn points for it. If you look at the last page of the following sample of my MEE Issue Spotting outline, you will see how an essay that simply spots the issues can receive an above-passing score:

On the subscription site, I have comparisons that let you compare graded essays/MPTs. For example, following are small samples of the February and July 2010 MPT comparisons:
http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/
http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/

If you are willing to self-evaluate, you can write an answer to a comparison question and then compare your answer to other graded answers (I am working on an automated way of doing this). For example, you can download the Feb 2010 MPT from NCBE’s website, answer the State of Franklin vs McLain MPT and then compare your answer to the graded ones in the comparison:
http://www.ncbex.org/pdfviewer/?file=%2Fdmsdocument%2F178

If this is too much effort, you can simply look at passing and above-passing essays/MPTs. For example, one subscriber told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” Put simply, good essays/MPTs look like other good essays/MPTs.

Do you provide MBE questions?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

No, I do not provide MBE questions on the full subscription site. Instead, I offer advice on the best MBE practice questions to use along with materials and advice that will help you substantially with the MBE. First, I tell subscribers the best MBE practice questions to use (and in what order) based on my extensive review of MBE practice questions over the years and followups with examinees. For most examinees, doing MBE practice questions is critical to their exam success (assuming the MBE practice questions are of sufficient difficulty and representative of the topics tested). Your MBE practice scores will also give you the most insight as to whether or not you will pass the exam. Thus, if you are answering questions of sufficient difficulty which are representative of the topics tested and tracking your % correct, you can use this information to adjust your study. For example, if your testing on these questions is not within a certain range, I offer alternative exam strategies.

Next, I provide the UBE MASTER outline along with a lot of useful MBE materials that are not offered by any other bar review. The subscription site is intended to act as a gap-filler. For example, in my review of the MBE, I determined that the MBE sometimes tests concepts directly from the Restatements and seminal cases (if I had to guess, it is maybe 10-20% of the MBE). Thus, I licensed the Restatements and selected the scenarios I regarded as relevant to the current MBE to make 600+ short answer questions (called MBE Flashcard exams). While these MBE Flashcard exams do not contain Civil Procedure (to fill this gap, I recommend to subscribers the best Civil Procedure materials based on the advice of examinees who scored high on the subject), you should still find them very helpful. For example, in post-exam followups with subscribers, I ask them to specify any supplemental bar review materials, courses or tutors they used for the exam and rank them in their order of effectiveness. A subscriber with an MBE score of 137.2 on the July 2016 UBE exam told me: “Seperac (quiz, mp3s, flashcards) Kaplan Mock Exams (too easy) Adaptibar (too simplistic) Critical Flashcards (better to do them alone)” In a F17 post-exam follow-up, a repeater who subscribed in F17 and passed told me: “I have already cleared the rest of the exams, so I have to start the paperwork for the admission at the Bar. My total score was 289 and my MBE score was 144.0. I studied for the bar since December 2016, but I had failed the July exam for 0.5%!. I used Barbri as my main course preparation and very useful was the online tool they have to show you where you have to work more. That is how I connected your amazing package with my study. Wherever I would see that I need to work harder, I was studying your material and I was doing your Restatement questions, which are the closest anyone can find to the new bar exam we had on February. I also had access to many Themis and Kaplan tests, which despite being or because they were too different from what I had helped me to be more prepared for the actual exam. I also studied less the week of the exam and nothing the day before (imagine I had to travel from Athens, Greece to Bufallo NY!). I was doing almost 100 questions per day except one day which was free and another day when I was doing almost 200 questions. Essays I did used the Barbri material, but I had no time to do many essays, so I was reading the rest. Before I sleep, I was reading your outline to refresh my memory. Let me now if this was helpful. PS: I was swimming twice per week.”

I explain the value of UBE MASTER outline on the Subscription page. However, one important aspect of the outline is that it contains rules for the 1,600+ released NCBE MBE questions. Thus, the UBE MASTER OUTLINE is especially helpful if you are not answering the released NCBE questions (because you previously answered them or because you are limited in time and you would prefer to focus on harder MBE questions). I strongly feel that the MBE materials/advice available on the subscription site help examinees significantly on the MBE. For example, the UBE MASTER OUTLINE contains 175 pages of black letter law on the 7 MBE subjects that is intended to represent the 175 graded MBE questions (meaning you won’t be blindsided by current MBE issues that receive short-shrift in other outlines). Thus, these 175 pages of content (plus another 100 pages of past MBE/MEE issues related to the MBE subjects) can essentially account for about 60-70% of your total UBE score.

If you are an auditory learner, you will love the subscription site. I make MP3s of a lot of the content (samples are on the subscription page) so you can listen to it rather than read it. For example, I make MP3s of the MBE rules for the 1,600+ released NCBE questions. Even if you are not an auditory learner, you should take advantage of these MP3s to form different memory impressions when you study. For example, a subscriber who passed with an MBE of 140.5 after failing with an MBE of 128.1 told me: “I believe in your method and system and like i said, if i can contribute to it further in any way - i would love to. In terms of what single thing helped me pass the MBE - i think it was writing out the MBE rules and listening to the mp3s the night before. My problem was that id get anxious and think i forgot everything - so listening to the mp3s in 2x speed and going over my mbe rules was big for me. I noticed that I'd make the same mistakes on similar issues over and over again so making sure I got those down really helped. Hearing it read out loud to me with the mp3s was big too.” This is another example of where the subscription site acts as a gap-filler – no other bar review has MP3s of the MBE Rules based on NCBE questions.

The most significant way in which the subscription site acts as a gap-filler is the advice and strategies it contains that are derived from my obsession with information and statistics which can help the outcome of individual examinees. The full subscription contains all the modules listed on the Subscription page, meaning you also have access to the MBE, MEE and MPT Strategy pages (which are usually updated and made available about one month before the exam). To me, if you are not continually improving, you are falling behind. Over the past ten years, I have statistically analyzed score sheets (4,000+), essays (2,000+), MPTs (600+), examinees (2,000+ supplemental post exam followups) and bar materials (1,500 bar-related books in a searchable database – if you are curious, I explain it here). Feel free to test me on this – paste 10-15 consecutive (and fairly unique) words from any printed bar exam source you have into an email to me and I will tell you where it is from within a minute (if you really want to test my speed, email me first to make sure I am at my computer, and once I confirm, email me the pasted text). In the past decade, I have likely spent more time analyzing the bar exam than any single person in the world. Thus, there is a lot of really good advice on the site. Everything I tell examinees to do (category priorities, MBE strategies, etc.), I fully explain the rationale behind it. In a way, it makes the subscription site much more daunting (I am aware of this), but I feel it is important for examinees to understand why I am telling them to do something (we know as lawyers that a judge would never issue an opinion without explaining the rationale behind it – I feel a bar review should be held to the same standard).

Do you recommend MBE questions to use?Answered 6/17.

Response Date: June 2017

While I regard some MBE question sources as better than others, it really comes down to the person and how they study. For example, one examinee who used only Barbri questions scored a 180 on the MBE. Another examinee who only used Adaptibar questions scored a 160 on the MBE. Meanwhile, other examinees who use only Barbri or Adaptibar questions will get a 120 on the MBE.

Please note that if you plan to use the released NCBE questions (e.g. Adaptibar, Barmax, Bestmultis, NCBE's website, Strategies & Tactics books, etc.), make sure to use them as a supplement and to focus on the 400 OPE questions (which are from 2006-2013) and take them repeatedly up until the exam date to obtain the rationales for why the options they select are either correct or incorrect (per NCBE’s instructions). The other 1,100 NCBE questions have limited value because of their age (these questions are from 1972-1998). For example, NCBE provides the following warning with their 1992 questions:

“The 581 questions contained in this document appeared on MBEs administered between 1972 and 1991. Because of their dated nature, many of the questions may test principles that have been altered by changes in the law and thus are no longer suitable topics to be tested. As a result, some of the answers shown in the answer key may be incorrect under currently accepted principles of law. Further, many of these questions do not reflect the current style of MBE questions, and a number of the questions appear in formats that are no longer used on the MBE. The questions and answers in this document are provided only for the purpose of providing applicants with a sample of the range and general format of questions that appeared on previously administered MBEs, not as examples of the content currently tested or of the material to be studied for the substance of the examination. Many of these questions are currently in use, sometimes with alteration, by commercial bar review courses under a licensing arrangement with NCBE. Because these questions are available in the marketplace, NCBE is choosing to make them available online. DO NOT USE THESE QUESTIONS TO STUDY CONTENT FOR THE MULTISTATE BAR EXAMINATION!!” see https://donbushell.com/lawaudio/pdf/MBEQuestions1992061411.pdf

Whether inadvertant or deliberate, NCBE uses two exclamation points to emphasize that examinees should not use the 1992 questions to study content for the MBE. The released 1991 and 1998 NCBE MBE questions (available at http://www.ncbex.org/exams/mbe/preparing/) contain similar warnings. Thus, according to the maker of the MBE, over 70% of their released NCBE questions should NOT be used for substantive preparation for the MBE. Personally, I feel that knowing the law behind the released questions is still helpful (I wrote rules for all the 1,600+ released questions so examinees get an idea of the law that has been tested on the exam in the past without having to go through the trouble of answering all the questions), but it is generally not a good idea to devote all your practice time to these questions if they are your only source of substantive MBE knowledge. I find that a lot of retakers actually see their MBE score go down if they only study the NCBE questions in their MBE practice. This is because the question topic distribution of the old NCBE questions is not reflective of the current exam and there are also significant gaps contextually. For example, out of the 1,600+ released NCBE questions, there are only two questions on Double Jeopardy (1/10 of 1% of the questions). In contrast, Double Jeopardy is tested fairly frequently on the current MBE (I expect it to represent about 1% of your total MBE score). Thus, if you only rely on the released NCBE questions for your knowledge of Double Jeopardy, you will be blind-sided on the MBE exam. The entire area of Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons is severely under-represented in the released NCBE questions (it is just 3% of the 1,600 NCBE questions, but expected to be 7% or more of your MBE score). If you miss 50% of the Criminal Procedure MBE questions due to this incomplete knowledge, that represents about 5 MBE points. To cite another major example, what is being tested on MBE Real Property has changed significantly and is not appropriately reflected in Adaptibar, S&T, Barmax, etc. (likewise, most bar reviews have not adjusted). For example, Fair Housing Act and broker commissions are tested on the MBE, yet you won't find these topics in most materials (instead you will find volumes on future interests & RAP which are now rarely tested). Thus, if your MBE study is based only on the law behind the released NCBE MBE questions, you will be under-prepared for some areas and over-prepared for others.

Check my UBE Score Estimator (which is primarily based on NYBOLE/NCBE studies) on seperac.com to predict an estimate of your total UBE score based on the entered demographic/grade data. The further away you are from passing, the fewer inefficiencies you can have in your studies. For example, a Domestic-educated Caucasian First-Time examinee with a high LSAT/LGPA can study somewhat inefficiently (e.g. put a lower percentage of their time into MBE study, or answer MBE practice questions from only one source, or answer only a few hundred MBE questions in practice) and still pass the exam. In contrast, if you are on the other end of the spectrum (Foreign-educated Non-Caucasian Repeat-Taker), you can’t afford any inefficiencies in your studies.

When a high-ability examinee studies for the bar exam, these examinees understand the material better because they had previously understood it in law school (you don’t get high grades in law school unless you demonstrate your knowledge of the subject matter on exams). These examinees generally also have good writing ability and good memory capacity (which contribute to both law school success and bar exam success). Thus, a high-ability examinee can do inefficient things like listen to the bar review lectures and still do fine on the exam. However, the lower your ability, the less room for error you have in your studying. For example, I strongly believe examinees MUST do well on the MBE in order to pass. There will always be outliers where examinees pass based on a low MBE score and a high written score, but in general it is the best measure of an examinee’s ability. This opinion is shared by NCBE who recently stated that "MBE scores are highly related to total bar exam scores." see http://www.ncbex.org/assets/media_files/Bar-Examiner/articles/2011/800411Testing.pdf

MBE scores are likely related to total bar exam scores because it takes a much longer time for lower-ability examinees to do well on the MBE. This is because an examinee essentially needs to understand 400-500 legal principles to receive an above passing MBE score. For example, a single intentional torts question may require you to know about assault, battery, false imprisonment and IIED to answer it correctly. Thus, examinees with limited legal knowledge will not do as well on the MBE as examinees with more extensive legal knowledge. In contrast, the MEE only consists of 20 legal principles (give or take a few). While a deeper understanding of the law is needed, it is MUCH easier for someone to get “lucky” on the MEE than the MBE. Let’s assume that like the MBE, you need 65% correct on the MEE to pass – this means you need to correctly identify/analyze about 13/20 of the MEE issues. If you get lucky on just a few of them (i.e. what you studied the night before luckily appears), this can account for 10-15% of your total MEE score. With every exam, I hear from examinees who “bluffed” essay answers and received good grades. For the MBE, you really can’t get lucky on it. Even if some of the concepts you studied just before the exam appeared, that will only help you with maybe 2-4 questions. That’s just 2% of your MBE score.

Furthermore, doing well on the MBE involves more than just knowledge – it also involves test-taking skills (and skills require drills). Acquiring this knowledge and skill takes a lot of time – thus if you don’t have a lot of time to spend studying/practicing for the MBE, it is hard to do well on it. While study for the other components of the exam can be “abbreviated” to some extent (e.g. using my materials to abbreviate your MEE essay study or just studying certain subjects and getting lucky), MBE study really can’t be given short-shrift, nor can MBE answered be “bluffed” as with the MEE/MPT (another reason why the bar examiners rely heavily on the MBE and even use it to scale essay/MPT scores).

Do you offer any discounts?Answered 7/17.

Response Date: July 2017

I suggest you first try my UBE Score Estimator. If you are expected to pass by 20+ points, continue your current course of study and stop worrying about supplemental materials.

If you are not expected to pass by 20+ points, if you are interested in a quid pro quo, I am offering a $30 coupon code to any examinee who agrees to complete my post-exam followup form within one week after taking the July 2017 UBE exam. The current version of the post-exam form is here. This post-exam followup form enables me assess the effectiveness of my materials (in a sense, it is how I keep my materials up-to-date). It can also help you later if you find out you failed the exam. For example, using this information, I track the key details of your attempt, so if you fail, I will try to match your responses/statistics to whoever previously submitted the most comparable details (and later passed) to give you their advice on what worked for them. To agree to this quid pro quo, simply use the following code for the $30 discount: YESTOPOSTEXAMFORM

If you are a retaker and you have your essays, I offer an additional $40 discount if you submit them to me (as an added bonus, I will also provide you with a free 40+ page MEE/MPT Analysis report). More information regarding this report is here.

Is your material downloadable immediately or is it shipped?Answered 7/17.

Response Date: July 2017

Everything is immediately downloadable (I do not ship anything to subscribers). Most of my materials are in WORD format, PDF format and MP3 format (explained in detail below). The WORD format lets you edit the material and make it your own. The PDF format lets you print/view it when you don't have WORD. The MP3 format lets you create a different memory impression by alternating your study-method (or when you simply get tired of reading).


EARLY SUBSCRIPTION MODULE

The SEPERAC EARLY SUBSCRIPTION module is intended to help examinees to prepare early for the exam (between now and December 27, 2017), especially first-time at-risk examinees, re-takers who failed the past exam, and re-takers who are retaking after a gap. I regard an at-risk examinee as one who is statistically more likely to fail the exam than pass it. For example, in regards to foreign examinees, I regard all foreign examinees as at-risk other than first-time examinees from Canada, Australia, or Germany. Other than the examinees from these three countries, foreign examinee generally have a pass rate of 50% or less on the bar exam (meaning these examinees are more likely to fail the exam than pass it on their first attempt). At risk-examinees also include all repeat takers and most part-time studiers. For example, over the past 20 years in New York, the February ABA Repeaters Pass Rate is 45.2% while the July ABA Repeaters Pass Rate is 32.5%. The repeater rates for foreign examinees are even lower. I made the UBE Score Estimator (which is primarily based on NYBOLE/NCBE studies) so examinees can predict an estimate of their total UBE score based on the entered demographic/grade data. The further away you are from passing, the fewer inefficiencies you can have in your studies. For example, a Domestic-educated Caucasian First-Time examinee with a high LSAT/LGPA can study rather inefficiently (e.g. not study full-time, put a lower percentage of their time into MBE study, or answer MBE practice questions from only one source, or answer only a few hundred MBE questions in practice) and still pass the exam. In contrast, if you are on the other end of the spectrum (Foreign-educated Non-Caucasian Repeat-Taker), you can’t afford any inefficiencies in your studies (meaning you should never deviate from the advice on the subscription site). I strongly believe that if you follow the advice and study the materials on this site, you will be putting yourself in the best position to pass the UBE exam. For example, according to a recent NCBE article, "it has been argued that variation in how Uniform Bar Examination (UBE) scores are produced across jurisdictions presents opportunities for examinees to shop around for a UBE jurisdiction that gives them the best shot at passing the bar exam." On the SEPERAC EARLY SUBSCRIPTION site, I tell examinees which UBE state gives them their best shot at passing the February 2018 bar exam. I also tell examinees the best UBE state that is geographically near New York. To do this, I analyzed the pass rate data for each UBE state over the past 21 years along with LSAT data over the past 5 years (to identify states where you are competing against less-able standardized test-takers).

The SEPERAC EARLY SUBSCRIPTION module is comprised of three main sections:

(1) An Early Study Time Allocation section that tells examinees exactly how to allocate their early study time;

(2) An Early Study Materials section that provides examinees on-point and up-to-date materials to enable efficient early study; and

(3) An Early Study Advice section that gives examinees advice to how to avoid the most common mistakes made by failing examinees.

Since 2005, I have statistically analyzed the scores from over 4,000+ failing examinees and post-exam follow-ups from 2,000+ examinees (both passing and failing). Furthermore, I have reviewed and statistically analyzed over 3,000 essays/MPT answers from over 500 failing examinees. I collect and analyze this information because I find it invaluable in learning what mistakes examinees commonly make. Everything I do on the subscription site is geared towards improving examinee outcomes by reducing mistakes. Examinees who are considered at risk of failing the exam must seriously embrace the advice on this site as it is built upon the mistakes of thousands of examinees. You must learn from these mistakes or else you are bound to make the same mistakes. Quite honestly, I feel there is no one better qualified to give examinees the correct advice on how to pass the exam.

On the SEPERAC EARLY SUBSCRIPTION site, I advise examinees as to what I regard as the optimal study-time allocation for the MBE, MEE and MPT components of the exam in early study. I also give advice on what MBE questions examinees should practice with in early study. In the Study Advice section, I breakdown what I regard as the 15 most common mistakes made by failing examinees along with my advice on how to avoid making those mistakes. When printed, the Early Subscription page content is 85 pages long. This early subscription site will give examinees good information on how to prepare for the UBE exam while avoiding the pitfalls encountered by many examinees. In addition, following are the materials available through the SEPERAC EARLY SUBSCRIPTION MODULE:

MBE COMPONENT: EARLY MBE OUTLINE

The most important outline on this early subscription site is the SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE (click on the below link to download a sample of it):

SAMPLE SEPERAC-F18 EXAM-EARLY MBE OUTLINE – Released August 27, 2017

The SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE is a 216 page outline is intended for early MBE study until the prioritized UBE MASTER outline is released in mid- to late-December 2017. The SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE is keyed to the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines and broken down into 169 MBE categories that represent the ABC level items in the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines. For each of the 169 categories, this outline contains the black letter law expected to be tested on the February 2018 MBE along with rules for every past tested non-OPE NCBE MBE question (1,200+ rule statements). The black letter law sections of the SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE will tell you what to expect on the upcoming exam, while the built-in MBE rules will tell you what was tested on the past. Furthermore, the expected number of MBE questions on the upcoming MBE is reported for each category. This is about as complete a picture as you can have of the current MBE exam. Since this outline is an excellent reflection of the current MBE exam, examinees should heavily rely on this outline to guide their MBE study (meaning if an area is covered in-depth, it is more important for the upcoming MBE than an area that is not covered in-depth).

Click here to read more about this


According to NCBE, "MBE scores are highly related to total bar exam scores." I have likewise found that if examinees do well on the MBE, they typically pass the exam. Thus, your early study should focus primarily on the MBE. The purpose of this outline is to familiarize early studiers with the material they can expect to see tested on the MBE in an efficient way. The MBE tests both past topics and new current topics and this outline is intended to help you with both. The past MBE topics are reflected in the built-in MBE rules. This outline contains synopses of the law for each of the 1,200+ released NCBE non-OPE MBE questions (these are the same questions in Adaptibar/Strategies & Tactics, Barmax, etc.). The SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE distills the 1,200 pre-OPE MBE questions into rule statements so examinees can get the gist of what was tested on the older released MBE questions without having to go through the questions. I also created a MBE Rules MP3 of these 1,200+ rules which is about 5 hours long. This is an excellent alternative method to acquire the black letter law behind what NCBE has tested in the past in a very efficient way. More so, these rules are organized by category so you can see the different ways each MBE category has been tested. Furthermore, by seeing the rules associated with the black letter law, it will make it easier to understand the law (remember, knowledge is constructed). For example, a subscriber that scored a 141.9 on the F16 MBE told me: “Knowing now that I passed, I can confidently say that your MBE Rules outline was indispensable.  Even though I probably completed only 400-500 practice MBEs, I really focused on thinking about why I got answers wrong, what aspect of the law I didn't quite understand, and creating rules that directly addressed that misunderstanding. I then reviewed these rules multiple times.

Please note that studying these rules is only one part of your overall MBE study. While the law behind past NCBE questions will give you insight into some of the legal concepts you can expect to see on the upcoming MBE, they often fail to be representative. For example, in the released NCBE questions, there are only two questions on Double Jeopardy (1/10 of 1% of the questions). In contrast, Double Jeopardy is tested fairly frequently on the current MBE (I expect it to represent about 1% of your total MBE score). Basically, the entire area of Constitutional Protection of Accused Persons is under-represented in the released NCBE questions (it is just 3% of the 1,600 NCBE questions, but expected to be 7% of your MBE score). To cite another example, the Rule of Perpetuities (from the Real Property subcategory of Special Problems) represents about 1% of the released NCBE questions, but on the upcoming exam, I expect this subcategory to be tested substantially less. Thus, if your MBE study is based only on the law behind the released NCBE MBE questions, you will be under-prepared for some areas and over-prepared for others. Accordingly, subscribers must study the black-letter law in the SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE in tandem with these MBE rules because the new current topics are appropriately reflected in the black letter law sections of the outline. I used these outlines to pass the exam in 2005 with an MBE score of 162. Since then, I have been continually improving them as I learn more and more about the wide range of nuances that are tested on the MBE. For example, a subscriber who scored a 174 on the MBE in NY and then a 177 on the MBE in NJ told me: “… as far as the MBE is concerned, your outlines have been most useful since you emphasize the fine distinctions.” Put simply, the better you understand the law in this outline, the better you will score on the Feb 2018 MBE and the more likely you will pass the exam.

HOW TO USE THE SEPERAC EARLY MBE OUTLINE                                     
Please note this information is also contained in the Introduction section of the outline itself

Each of the 169 categories in this outline are ordered based on the ABC level of the 2017 NCBE Subject Matter outlines. Each of the 169 categories has a heading that appears as follows:

ConLaw: Cat II: Sep of Powers (A. The powers of Congress) – MBE: 1-2 Qs

The prefix tells you the Subject (e.g. ConLaw), the NCBE Category (e.g. Cat II: Sep of Powers), and the NCBE ABC level (e.g. A. The powers of Congress). The next part of the heading tells you how many graded MBE questions (out of 175 graded MBE questions) you can expect to see on the MBE exam from this category. For example, MBE: 1-2 Qs means that the category of Constitutional Law Separation of Powers should represent between 1- 2 of the 175 graded  questions on the upcoming Feb 2018 MBE.

After each category, I outline what I regard as the relevant black letter law to cover the majority of what you can expect to see tested on the MBE along with any rules I wrote based on the released NCBE non-OPE MBE questions. Each MBE rule section appears as follows:

Seperac Rules for NCBE MBE Issues Tested on Sep of Powers – The powers of Congress

Underneath this heading is a box containing a rule I wrote for every released NCBE non-OPE question (from the 1991, 1992, 1998 NCBE question books/exams along with the 2015 and 2017 NCBE information books). Each rule has a rule number prefix that can be used to follow along if you are listening to MP3s of the rules. At the end of each rule is a parenthetical suffix to tell you from which exam/question the rule is based on.


There is also an MP3 of the 1,200+ Rule Statements built into the outline (a sample can be downloaded here):


SAMPLE SEPERAC-F18 EXAM-EARLY MBE OUTLINE-MBE RULES MP3 – Released August 27, 2017


The full MP3 is 5 hours and 20 minutes long and follows the same order as the MBE rules in the EARLY MBE OUTLINE. Listening to MP3 of the rules is an effective way to learn the material by forming different memory impressions. For example, a subscriber who passed with an MBE of 140.5 after failing with an MBE of 128.1 told me: “I believe in your method and system and like i said, if i can contribute to it further in any way – i would love to. In terms of what single thing helped me pass the MBE – i think it was writing out the MBE rules and listening to the mp3s the night before. My problem was that id get anxious and think i forgot everything – so listening to the mp3s in 2x speed and going over my mbe rules was big for me. I noticed that I'd make the same mistakes on similar issues over and over again so making sure I got those down really helped. Hearing it read out loud to me with the mp3s was big too.

MEE COMPONENT: MEE ISSUE SPOTTING COMPENDIUM

Next, there is an MEE Issue Spotting Compendium that will enable examinees to become very proficient at MEE issue spotting, which is the first step in MEE study and review (click on the below link to download a sample of it):

SAMPLE OF SEPERAC MEE ISSUE SPOTTING COMPENDIUM – Released August 27, 2017

I regard issue spotting as the most important part of a passing MEE answer so this outline should significantly contribute to an above-passing MEE score on the upcoming exam. If you do not spot the issues, it is very hard to score points on an essay. The key to issue spotting is to practice. Since fact patterns frequently repeat themselves in some form or another, the more fact patterns you examine, the easier issue spotting will become.

Click here to read more about this


The Seperac MEE Issue Spotting Compendium serves as an excellent way to familiarize yourself with how the questions for each subject are posed, what issues are at play, and what the outcomes are, along with a brief discussion of the answer. For examinees that have practiced essays and are confident their writing and analysis will be satisfactory, this Issue Spotting Compendium enables an examinee to efficiently review a wide range of past MEE essays (most likely the most important ones) and their corresponding issues/answers to improve their issue spotting and knowledge. For example, in a post-exam follow-up, in asking what examinees found "LEAST helpful" in their studies, one examinee told me: "I spent a long time writing out whole essays for grading by a "professor"... Because I felt that I was being evaluated by someone and I was submitting a work product, I ended up spending too much time making every essay as perfect as possible. Some of the essays were not MEE style, but simply more complicated with tons more issues. I don't think that this was a good use of my time. I would have preferred to outline essays or practice spotting issues."

This compendium contains every released MEE question from 2002 to Feb 2017 (with the exception of Negotiable Instruments/Commercial Paper questions which are no longer tested on the MEE exam). This compendium contains 218 MEE questions on the 14 testable MEE subjects: Agency & Partnership, Civil Procedure, Conflict of Laws, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Corporations & LLCs, Criminal Law & Procedure, Evidence, Family Law, Real Property, Secured Transactions, Torts, Trusts, and Wills & Estates. Please note that MEE testing of the MBE subjects (with the exception of Civil Procedure) only began in July 2007, so there are fewer MEE questions for these subjects.
The MEE questions in this Issue Spotting Compendium are grouped by subject, with the questions sorted from newest to oldest. Examinees should focus on one subject at a time, reading each question from that subject and then attempting to issue spot (either on paper or in your head). The questions and short answers in this compendium are separated by a page break so an examinee can read each question without any hint of the answer, and the examinee can then go to the answer explanation on the next page to self-assess. The questions for each subject are sorted from most recent to least recent because I regard the more recent exam questions as more important (much like the recently released MBE questions in the OPE 1-4 exams better reflect the current MBE, the recently released MEE questions from 2011-2017 better reflect the current MEE).

The Answer Analysis section contains a list of the relevant legal problems tested in the question (which are referred to as “Issues”) along with an answer to each legal problem, and then an Answer Discussion which consists of a brief overview of the answer. The Issue answers are color coded so examinees can quickly determine how the issue was resolved (Red for No, Green for Yes and Blue means Not Applicable). Each Issue reports its assigned score value which provides some insight into how much knowledge and analysis is required for each Issue. For example “POINT 1 (25%)means that this issue was worth 25%  of an examinee’s total score for that essay (and generally should represent about 25% of your writing).

If you go to View from the WORD menu, if you check "Navigation pane" in the Show menu, you will see a hyperlinked navigation pane on the left side of the document. This enables you to quickly jump around between questions. As a word document, the document is editable – you can make this document your own by adding or removing text, increasing the font size, changing the margins, or adding comments, special formatting/highlighting. The default font is Times New Roman because this is the font NCBE uses for the MEE questions, but feel free to change it if you prefer something more readable. In addition, examinees can search the document for keywords in the past essay questions and answers. On the Menu/Ribbon, if you go to View, there is a macro button called "Count Words." If you click on the button, a dialog box will ask "What word do you want to count?" Enter a word or a phrase and then press OK.

This MEE Issue Spotting Compendium serves as a well-organized way to familiarize yourself with how the questions for each subject are posed, what issues are at play, and what the outcomes are, along with a brief discussion of the answer. For examinees that have practiced essays and are confident in their writing and analysis, this MEE Issue Spotting Compendium enables an examinee to efficiently review a wide range of past MEE essays (likely the most important ones) and their corresponding issues/answers to improve their issue spotting and knowledge. In addition, there are MP3s of this compendium for each subject on the subscription site. I recommend that examinees alternate between reading this outline and listen to the MP3s of this outline since it is a great way to create different memory impressions in your studies.

I feel that all examinees (regardless of school/rank/grades/race/gender) need to practice their issue spotting for the MEE. Even if you were good at issue spotting in law school exams, you must still make sure that you are competent at issue spotting on MEE exams because the MEE may present the issues in a way that you are unfamiliar with. The MEE Issue Spotting Compendium is a great tool for efficiently understanding the wide range of issues relevant to each previously tested MEE legal topic. Put simply, the only way to really become familiar with how the issues are presented on the MEE is to practice issue spotting on past MEE exams. In addition, audio files of the Issue Spotting Compendium in MP3 format organized by subject are available (click to download a sample):

SAMPLE-SEPERAC-F18 EXAM-MEE ISSUE SPOTTING COMPENDIUM MP3 – Released September 6, 2017

On the site, there are streamable MP3s of the Issue Spotting Compendium by subject (over 16 hours of audio). I find that listening is an effective way to absorb the information, as each different memory you can create in your studying (e.g. listening versus reading) will help you to later recall the information. When I studied for the bar exam, I made MP3s of the multiple choice questions and listened to them when I commuted. Later, when I made MASTER, I made MP3s of the essays to listen to. I found listening to the essays (questions and answers) to be more efficient than listening to the multiple choice questions. I also felt that I understood the essays better by listening to them as opposed to reading them. Put simply, there is no better way of knowing the exam than the exam itself. Therefore, there is no better way of understanding the exam than by looking at prior exams. Every examinee should try the MP3s to see if they are helpful as an alternate learning tool. Audio versions of the materials you study are a great way to create different forms of memory impressions. For example, one subscriber told me: "I realized during this process that I actually am much more of an auditory learner, and I found myself able to focus more and retain more from audio or audio with text than I ever have just by reading.  So the fact that you provide so many audio resources made a big difference for me.  I heavily used the audio MBE rules as well."


MPT COMPONENT: MPT COMPARISON

The MPT is a "closed universe" practical problem using instructions, factual data, cases, statutes and other reference material. Accordingly, the most useful thing an examinee can do for early MPT study is to answer MPTs under exam conditions and then dissect their answers along with the answers of high-scoring MPTs to see how the answers differ in regards to their use of the factual data, cases, statutes and other reference materials. This process of examination often leads to a good understanding of how to compose an above-passing MPT. I created an MPT Comparison to enable examinees to do this. Utilizing this Comparison, examinees can learn how other examinees (especially high scoring examinees) incorporate the MPT File and Library in their answers. Examinees can also use this MPT Comparison to analyze their own MPT answer to the question. Once you finish your answer, use the MPT Comparison I created to dissect the MPT (click on the below link to see a sample of the hyperlinked Comparison page).

Sample of February 2010 Seperac MPT Comparison – Released September 1, 2017

I explain how to utilize this MPT Comparison below:

Click here to read more about this


In a March 2014 article entitled "It Should Be About Feedback and Revision" by J. Elizabeth Clark, an English professor at LaGuardia Community College who wrote that "[h]igh-stakes essay writing is about learning to game the system. Good test takers are just that: Students who learned the rules of the game, often through expensive test-prep courses that disadvantage poor and at-risk students. Those with greater access to coaches and materials and practice do better on the exam, but that does not mean they are better writers." This MPT Comparison is an excellent way for examinees to learn "the rules of the game." Put simply, there is no other resource available that enables examinees to compare and contrast a number of graded MPTs and compare them to one another or to other discrete elements of the MPT question/answer. Please use this to your advantage, especially if you do not have the time to practice many MPTs.

In my statistical analysis of the text of hundreds of graded examinee MPTs over the past seven years, I have determined that MPT answers that have more language in common with the NCBE point sheet, the higher the MPT score (assuming the examinee concluded correctly). This means you must know the format, style and tone that are expected, know what arguments to make, and know what portions of the library/statutes/cases you should use to support your position. The best way to do this is to deconstruct MPT answers.

Basically, you want to take apart good MPT answers to see how they are constructed. Doing this on your own is rather tedious (and also assuming that you have a good sample of high-scoring MPT answers to work with). This online MPT Comparison is a computerized way to accomplish the same result. The F10 MPT Comparison lets you visually see what text was used from every discrete component that make up the MPT as compared to any other item in the Comparison. The Comparison consists of the following discrete elements:

• The MPT File and Library
• The five individual pieces of the MPT File (e.g. File-Item 1-Memorandum from Marcia Pierce, etc)
• The four individual pieces of the MPT Library (e.g. Library-Item 1-Excerpts from the Franklin Criminal Code)
• The MPT Point Sheet (identifies what points needed to be discussed and their respective point allocations)
• The MPT Model Answer provided by NCBE (considered a perfect MPT answer)
• The two above-average released answers provided by NYBOLE (considered top-scoring examinee exemplars)
• Graded MPT answers from 22 examinees that range in score from 28.93 to 63.44 (any score above 50.44 was regarded as an above-passing MPT answer for the F10 exam)

In the MPT Comparison, each and every item is compared to every other item. There are three columns on the report – a "Matching Words" column, a "Text Comparison" column, and a "PDF Comparison" column. The "Matching Words" column reports the number of perfectly matching words (minimum of two words) that have been marked in the pair of documents. It includes too-short phrases that require bridging over non-matching words in order to count as matching between the two documents (e.g. a match would occur if one document said "United States constitution" and the other document said "United States America constitution"). In such cases, the bridging word will appear in green. Each "Matching Words" row item has 3 subparts: (a) the number of matching words; (b) what percentage of the first document is accounted for by these matching words; and (c) what percentage of the second document is accounted for by these matching words. For example, in regards to the following row:

Matching Words

MPT Text comparison

MPT PDF comparison

463 [59%,8%] F10-MPT-Score 53.22-Typed-ID 019 vs. F10-MPT-NCBE-File and Library F10-MPT-Score 53.22-Typed-ID 019 vs. F10-MPT-NCBE-File and Library


This means that there are 463 word matches (minimum of two words) between the two documents being compared on that row. The first document is an answer to the MPT from the Feb 2014 exam that was typed by Examinee ID #019 and received a score of 53.22. The second document is the NCBE File and Library for the F10 MPT. The 59% means that 59% of the first document (the 53.22 MPT) consists of words that match the second document (the NCBE File and Library). The 8% means that 8% of the second document (the NCBE F10 File and Library) consists of words that match the first document (the 53.22 MPT).

The "Text Comparison" column shows the text matches between the two MPTs you select. In the reports, perfect matches are indicated by red-underlined words and bridging, but non-matching words are indicated by green-italicized-underlined words. The matching phrases are links. If you click on a matching phrase, you will be taken to the equivalent phrase in the other document of the pair. For example, you can compare a high scoring MPT to a Library item to see how that MPT incorporated that Library item into the answer. Alternatively, you can compare high-scoring MPTs to the Point Sheet, NYBOLE Released Answers or the NBCE Model Answer to see in what ways the MPT identifies with these exemplars. Finding a high level of commonality in the matching words of passing MPTs can help examinees develop a better vocabulary for those issues. Basically, the more you learn about what comprises a good MPT, the better you will do on future MPTs. Another benefit of this Comparison is the ability to look at low-scoring MPTs to learn what not to do (in regards to not only content, but also style and layout). As it is often said: "A clever person learns from his own mistakes, but a wise person learns from others’ mistakes."

The "PDF Comparison" column shows the PDFs of the two essays you select side-by-side. This is useful for seeing the actual formatting of high-scoring MPTs (bolding, italicizing, underlining, headings, etc). Put simply, good MPTs look like other good MPTs.

In the tables, the hyperlink naming convention operates for the graded examinee MPTs as follows:
Exam-Essay-Score-Typed/Written-ID

For example, the naming convention "F10-MPT-Score 53.22-Typed-ID 019" means that this is an MPT from the February 2010 New York bar exam, the scaled score of the essay was 53.22 (which was an above passing score), the examinee typed the essay, and the randomly generated ID of the candidate was 019 (so you can differentiate between the 22 examinees). In a few instances, the Typed/Written status of an essay is "Typed Edited." This means that the MPT is a typed MPT, but it is not in its original format because the examinee edited it. For these MPTs, you must keep in mind that what you are seeing may not be exactly what the bar grader saw in regards to layout or format.

If the MPT is an above average answer released by NY BOLE, in place of an ID, the following appears:
NYBOLE-Released Answer 1
NYBOLE-Released Answer 2

Please note that these released above average answers do not have scores, these essays likely received scores between 80-85 (whereas the highest examinee MPT received a score of 63.44).

I recommend that examinees use Firefox to browse the MPT Comparison. Using Firefox, examinees can install the add-on Snap Links Plus. This add-on enables examinees to select a number of links with a rectangle and open them all in new tabs. Accordingly, examinees can select all the links of a high scoring MPT and then open each comparison in a separate tab in Firefox. The examinee can then press CTRL+TAB to go from tab to tab. This ends up being a very efficient way to review the essays. When an examinee is done reviewing, the examinee should go to the main tab, right click, choose "Close Other Tabs" and then start again with another high scoring essay.

Utilizing the materials and the advice on the EARLY SUBSCRIPTION site will provide you with the information and guidance you need to study early for the exam with optimal efficiency (essentially no wasted time or inefficiencies in preparation). No matter what your demographic is, or what your past results were, I believe any examinee can pass the exam if they follow my advice and demonstrate it through practice.

Subscriptions to the EARLY SUBSCRIPTION module are now available. The cost to subscribe to the EARLY SUBSCRIPTION module is $175. Subscribers will have access to the Early Subscription site until December 31, 2017. Subscriptions to the full subscription site will be available in November-December 2017. Currently, the cost for a full subscription is $400. Examinees insterested in subscribing to the full subscription site (which includes the UBE MASTER outline) can subscribe now to the Early Subscription site ($175) and then upgrade to the full subscription site when it is available for an additional $225 (prices subject to change).

   



Please note that this EARLY SUBSCRIPTION module does NOT contain the UBE MASTER outline (which becomes available on the full subscription site in December 2017). Furthermore, while content on the full subscription site contains topic priorities for the upcoming exam, the material on this site does NOT contain any such priorities. Please make sure to review the samples of the available materials before you subscribe.

 

MEE STUDY MODULE

This module consists of materials and advice specifically for the MEE. Every MEE question ever released by NCBE can be downloaded in this module. However, offering past MEE questions and answers is not something that is unique – many bar reviews provide these questions and the older MEE questions can also be downloaded for free from NCBE's website. What is unique about the Seperac MEE Study Module is that I take MEE materials and re-organize them into more useful/efficient study tools. This is helpful to examinees who are limited in time or who only plan limited MEE study because they intend to focus on the MBE. For example, I put all 309 MEE questions and answers into a single document sorted by subject to enable easier studying, testing, review, comparison, and searching. There are also 34 hours of MP3 audio files covering the last 200+ MEE questions and answers (from July 2017 to July 2007) in order to create different memory impressions. For MEE issue spotting, there is an MEE Quick Review Issue Spotting outline that consists of the last 200+ MEE questions along with the actual issues tested plus with a short answer summary (to enable efficient MEE issue review). If you are very limited in time, there is are MP3 audio files of this issue spotting outline to test yourself as you commute, cook, or work out. There are MEE Essay Comparisons that compare actual graded MEE answers to one another and to the model answers so you can better understand what a passing answer consists of. I even provide a terminology list of "buzz-words" based on the MEE answers from 1995 to present.

The MEE Study Module essentially consists of MEE study materials that are not available anywhere else (along with general advice on how to study for the MEE and how to effectively use the module). Click on the below links to expand the item explanations and to view samples. I regard the MEE Study Module as worth purchasing if: (1) you don’t have access to the released MEE questions/answers and plan to buy them; OR (2) you are an auditory learner; OR (3) you need to improve your MEE issue spotting; OR (4) you intend to answer MEE questions in practice and plan to self-grade/self-evaluate. If you plan to buy the released MEE questions & answers, it is more cost-effective (and extremely more efficient) to obtain these questions/answers/synopses through this MEE Study module ($145 for the MEE Study Module if you agree to complete the Post-Exam form versus $150 to purchase the 2012-2017 MEEs from NCBE) and you will also gain access to a lot of other useful MEE materials/tools that no other bar review provides.

Seperac MEE Essay Compilation (containing the last 46 MEE exams)Click to read more

Click here to see a sample of the Seperac MEE Essay Compilation

Basically, this is a WORD file of all the released MEE questions and answers from 1995 to July 2017 (46 exams) in a single document where the information is edited and arranged in a certain way to make MEE studying/practice much more efficient. For example, the compilation is sorted by subject to make it easier to see testing patterns, it is edited to remove the unnecessary information (10% smaller), the questions no longer tested (UCC3) are absent from the compilation, the answers follow the questions for easy grading/review, every answer is divided into discrete sections based on issue with point values so you can self-evaluate, and it also contains released MEE answers from other states that are color coded to visually demonstrate how the IRAC phrases (in green), issue legal terminology (in blue) and statutes/law (in red) are weaved together by high-scoring examinees.

Much like the recently released MBE questions (OPE 1-4) reflect the current MBE, the recently released MEE questions reflect the current MEE. Accordingly, I licensed the 1995-2017 MEE exams from NCBE and then created a single MEE Compilation document (to purchase the 2012-2017 MEEs from NCBE costs $150). This Seperac MEE Essay Compilation contains all the MEE exams from Feb 1995 to July 2017 (46 exams) in a single document, along with MEE answer exemplars from other states. In this document, all 309 NBCE MEE answers have been significantly edited to improve their readability for studying purposes. The document is released in WORD and PDF format, so it is editable and searchable. An explanation of this compilation and a sample of it can be viewed here. The licensed NCBE MEE Questions and Answers from 1995 to present can also be downloaded as PDFs from the subscription site.

In the March 2015 Testing Column of the NCBE Bar Examiner, the Director of NCBE Test Operations stated: "To prepare graders, NCBE provides detailed grading materials, which are subjected to review by outside content experts, editing by drafting committees, and proofing and cite-checking by NCBE lawyer-editors. ... the grading materials are included in MEE and MPT study aids, so prospective examinees can become familiar with the questions and what graders are looking for in examinee answers." Thus, by reviewing the NCBE grading materials contained in this MEE Compilation document, you are looking at what the graders are also looking at.

Reviewing past MEE questions and answers is one of the best ways to prepare for the MEE. The purpose of this MEE Compilation is to enable more efficient MEE review based on 6 unique enhancements: (1) All 309 released MEE questions and NCBE Answer Analyses from 1995 to present are contained in a single document that is hyperlinked (for easy navigation) and searchable; (2) the 309 MEE questions are grouped by subject (sorted from newest to oldest) to efficiently develop a comprehensive understanding of the issues tested for each subject on the MEE (with questions based on subjects no longer tested being removed); (3) for 86 of the more recent MEE questions, there is an accompanying released MEE answer exemplar from another state (New York, Minnesota and Arkansas) which also contains comprehensive color coding to visually demonstrate how the IRAC phrases (in green), issue legal terminology (in blue) and statutes/law (in red) are weaved together by high-scoring examinees; (4) each answer appears immediately after each question to enable quick review or issue spotting; (5) each NCBE Answer Analysis has been edited for more efficient study (answers are 10% shorter than the answers contained in the NCBE books); and (6) audio MP3 versions of the MEE questions and NCBE Answer Analyses  are available for the last 20 MEE exams on the subscription site so you can create different memory impressions when you are commuting, working out, cooking, etc.

Since 1995, NCBE has released 46 MEE exams (from Feb 1995 to July 2017). Each MEE exam contains 6-9 questions (7 questions in exams from Feb 1995 to Feb 2007, 9 questions in exams from July 2007 to July 2013 and 6 questions in exams from Feb 2014 to Feb 2017) along with a corresponding answer analysis from NCBE for each question. Currently, the MEE tests 14 subjects: Agency & Partnership, Civil Procedure, Conflict of Laws, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Corporations & LLCs, Criminal Law & Procedure, Evidence, Family Law, Real Property, Secured Transactions, Torts, Trusts, and Wills & Estates. The subjects of Agency & Partnership, Corporations, Civil Procedure, Conflicts, Family Law, Secured Transactions, Trusts and Wills & Estates have been tested since February 1995 while MEE testing of the MBE subjects (with the exception of Civil Procedure) began in July 2007. In addition, NCBE formerly tested the subject of Negotiable Instruments/Commercial Paper, but this subject was removed from MEE exam-testing in February 2014.

Utilizing these licensed MEE materials, I created this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document which contains all the released MEE essay questions and answer analysis from Feb 1995 to present. This compilation is a very efficient way to review the MEE essay questions and answers. It is superior to the individual MEE exam PDFs available from NCBE (which are available on the subscription site) for six main reasons:

• This Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document contains all the MEE exams from 1995 to present in a single document. This is a significant time-saver. Utilizing the hyperlinked Table of Contents or Microsoft Word’s Navigation Pane, you can jump to any subject, question or answer instantly. To use the hyperlinked Table of Contents, simply hold down the CTRL key and click on an item in the Table of Contents and you will jump to that question in the Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document. In addition, if you go to View from the menu, if you check "Navigation pane" in the Show menu, you will see a hyperlinked navigation pane on the left side of the document. By creating a word document, the document is editable and searchable. You can make this document your own, by adding notes, comments, or special formatting or highlighting. In addition, examinees can search the document for keywords in the past essay questions and answers. On the Menu/Ribbon, if you go to View, there is a macro button called "Count Words." If you click on the button, a dialog box will ask "What word do you want to count?" Enter a word or a phrase and then press OK. For example, if you enter the phrase "attractive nuisance", you will be told that "attractive nuisance appears 2 times" in the questions and answers from 1995 to present.

• Unlike the MEE booklets released by NCBE, the MEE questions in this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document are grouped by subject, with the questions sorted from newest to oldest. This enables an examinee to quickly and efficiently get an understanding of each MEE subject. For example, an examinee with very little study time should look at the first few questions from each MEE subject while an examinee who has a good bit of study time should look at 5-10 questions from each MEE subject. Comprehensively seeing how the MEE tests a subject will help you spot issues for that subject because you will have a complete picture of what has been tested in the past. Furthermore, only the relevant MEE questions are included in this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation. For example, the 30 questions on UCC Article 3 Negotiable Instruments Commercial Paper (tested in the Feb 1995-July 2013 exams) have been removed because this subject is no longer tested on the MEE. Likewise, if there is a cross-over question (e.g. Contracts & Commercial Paper or Negotiable Instruments). It has been removed so that you don’t waste any time studying topics that are no longer tested on the MEE.

• This Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document also contains released MEE answers from other states. Currently, 86 of the 309 MEE questions have exemplars from states of New York, Minnesota and Arkansas (please note that these exemplars may occasionally refer to their state law within these answers). By analyzing these above average answers, examinees will learn to write passing MEE essays by example. These "best examinee" answers provide insight as to what type of writing and how much knowledge and analysis is required for an above average score that is not at the level of the released NCBE Answer Analyses. Put simply, there is an architecture to high scoring essays. For example, in examining the released MEE essay answers, there is generally a consistent framework of how a question is answered. In order to get an "above-average" score on the essays, examinees should emulate the structure of the above-average answers. If you can adapt their writing style to the format expected and use the terminology the bar graders are familiar with, you increase your chance of getting a better score. To illustrate this framework, for each of the 86  released "above-average" examinee MEE essay answers, I highlight in green each time the examinee used an IRAC-type introductory phrase to discuss/analyze an issue or to transition to a different part of the IRAC framework. Please note that each of these essays was likely from a different examinee, so these "above-average" essay answers illustrate the IRAC framework of 86 examinees. I highlight in blue each time the examinee used issue legal terminology (i.e. "buzz-words) that illustrate the examinee’s understanding of the law in question. Finally, I highlight in red each time the examinee referred to a statute, case, law or rule. This shows you what statutes/rules are worthy of mention on the MEE when tested (and also how infrequently they are necessary). It is important that you peruse these essays once to understand how the IRAC framework and statute references are used in the highest scoring answers - think of these essays as "blue-prints" of how you should compose your own essay answers. Please keep in mind the law may not always be correct in these examinee answers and you should always refer to the NCBE Answer analysis for the correct law.

• In this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document, the NCBE Answer Analysis always appears after the question. In the released MEE exam booklets, the questions are grouped together and then the corresponding answers are grouped together. This requires an examinee to hunt for the answer to each question. In addition, the questions and answers in this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document are separated by a page break so an examinee can read an MEE essay and answer the question (or quickly issue spot) without any hint of the answer, and the examinee can then go to the answer explanation(s) on the next page. This means that an examinee can use this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document not only for MEE studying, but also for MEE testing.

• Each NCBE Answer Analysis in this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document has been significantly edited to  make them more readable and to make them appear more like written essay answers. In the released MEE exams, the answers contain numerous citations that are irrelevant to an examinee answering the MEE questions. Removing these superfluous citations has made the answers 10% shorter. Examinees simply do not have the time to read or research these citations. I left in only the most important citations, and I abbreviated these citations to reduce their complexity. In addition, the MEE answers are better organized. In some cases, the number of Legal Problems in the Answer Analysis did not correspond with the number of Answer points. In all cases, this has been fixed so the answers are consistent. All these changes are intended to make studying for the MEE more efficient. Please note that all the typographical errors I encounter are corrected in these essays, so they will not mirror the MEE essays released by NCBE. Also, there are intentional (but de minimus) mistakes intended to identify any copying/sharing of this compilation.

• There are also 34 hours of MP3 audio files covering the last 200+ MEE questions and NCBE Answer Analyses (from July 2017 to July 2007) downloadable from the subscription site. Audio versions of the materials you study are a great way to create different forms of memory impressions (meaning if on the exam if you don’t remember something you read, you may remember something you heard). If you are limited on time or you are an auditory learner, use the MP3s when you commute/cook/work out (or just get sick of reading). Every examinee should try the MP3s to see if they are helpful as an alternate learning tool. As one subscriber told me: "I realized during this process that I actually am much more of an auditory learner, and I found myself able to focus more and retain more from audio or audio with text than I ever have just by reading. So the fact that you provide so many audio resources made a big difference for me."

According to NYBOLE, “... the MEE questions are designed to test the candidate’s skills of issue identification, factual and legal analysis, and written communication, as well as knowledge of the law.” Since these are the skills you need to develop for the upcoming MEE, I suggest you primarily rely on the NCBE answers contained in this Seperac MEE Essays Compilation document to issue spot, learn the applicable law and how to respond to the questions. I recommend that examinees read or listen to the MP3s of the MEE essays and NCBE answers for the last ten administrations. Reading, listening to, outlining, and answering these MEE essays will teach you how to compose an MEE answer that the bar examiners are looking for. The MEE answers from NCBE can be regarded as model answers (however, please note that since each answer to each issue generally stands on its own, portions of the answers may seem repetitive between some points). These NCBE answers are important to learn because the essay graders will be relying on these MEE answer analyses for grading purposes, so the more familiar you are with what the MEE graders are looking for, the better your essay score should be. For example, by studying these MEE answers from NCBE, you will know what seminal cases are relevant to certain legal topics, what statutes and acts are relevant to certain legal areas, and what black letter law rules and analysis NCBE deems relevant to each issue.

Examinees should also review the released exemplar MEE answers from other states (where available, these answers appear after the NCBE MEE answer) to understand what a more realistic MEE answer appears like. These are top scoring essays, so the quality of your essay will be lower, but study these essays to pick up on their formatting, issue spotting, and analysis. As a rule of thumb, you can achieve an above-passing MEE score if you write 50% of an NCBE MEE answer or 50%-70% of a state released answer (FYI, the MEE answer analyses from NCBE average 1,350 words per answer while the examinee exemplars from New York, Minnesota and Arkansas average 887 words per answer). Put simply, an examinee can write a passing MEE answer if: (1) for 100% of the topics in the MEE question, you correctly issue spot, provide a relevant 1-sentence analysis, and arrive at the correct conclusion for each issue; OR (2) for 75% of the topics in the MEE question, you correctly issue spot, provide a relevant 2-4 sentence analysis, and arrive at the correct conclusion for these issues (assuming the point values for the MEE topics are weighted roughly the same); OR (3) for 50% of the topics in the MEE question, you write a very good answer and for the other topics, you make some cogent points with good analysis even if the issues, analysis and conclusion are incorrect (again assuming the point values for the MEE topics are weighted roughly the same). Basically, if you can spot the issues, demonstrate to the grader that you spotted the issues by using the appropriate terminology (the same terminology used in the NCBE Answer Analyses) and you perform some factual analysis, that will be a passing essay. The worse you do on one aspect of this, the better you need to do on the other aspects to have a passing essay. Keep in mind that there is no guarantee a particular essay will ever receive a particular score – such is the subjectivity of essay grading.

I recommend that examinees read (and/or listen to the MP3s of) the MEE essays and answers for the last ten administrations, if not more. The purpose of reading these essays is to understand how MEE essay questions are posed and how to identify the issues and appropriately respond. Reading, listening to, outlining, and answering these MEE essays will teach you how to compose an MEE answer that the bar examiners are looking for.

If you have the released MEE questions, you can essentially grade yourself by comparing your answers to the NCBE answer analyses. According to the maker of the MEE: “NCBE’s grader training and materials also assign weights to subparts in a question. So an examinee who performs well on one subpart of an MEE question worth 25% of the total score that could be awarded for that question is not assured a 6 unless he performs well on the other parts of the question, too, in comparison with other examinees. In other words, there is a weighting framework for assigning points, which helps to keep graders calibrated and consistent.” see the March 2015 NCBE Testing Column: Judith A. Gundersen, The Testing Column, Essay Grading Fundamentals, The Bar Examiner (March 2015). This differs from pre-UBE essay grading where it appeared the graders reviewed the essays more holistically (i.e. looking at the overall answer and then assigning a score). On the MEE, the graders are somewhat constrained by the grading weights, meaning that a well written answer with good reasoning that misses issues will probably score lower than a poorly written answer with basic analysis that correctly identifies all the issues.

Since the graders are referring to a point-sheet, I believe issue-spotting is paramount on the MEE (this is why I made the MEE Quick Review Issue Spotting outline). Because an MEE question must be answered in 30 minutes, there is less time for an examinee to write a thoughtful analysis that might sway the grader. Instead, the MEE is seemingly designed as a hit-and-run exam where examinees must hit each issue and then simply run to the next one. In such circumstances, if what you say is not on the grader’s checklist, you are not likely to earn points for it. For example, following is a J16 MEE essay that received an above-passing score by merely spotting the issues and writing the rules with some short analysis and correct conclusions.

If you are willing to self-evaluate, I suggest you write answers to released MEE questions under timed conditions and then consult the NCBE Answer Analysis to determine your grade. For each discrete point that is graded, if you correctly spotted the issue and concluded correctly (with some accurate law and relevant analysis in-between), you can confidently give yourself half-credit for that answer. If you can score half-credit for every issue, it will likely be an above-passing MEE answer. For example, Essay #3 from the July 2016 MEE (Torts) dealt with the issues of 'standard of care', 'strict liability', 'products liability' and 'market share liability.' For this Torts essay, I found that examinees that addressed the issues by simply applying the negligence standard of duty, breach, causation and liability generally did not receive above-passing scores (further supporting by belief that issue spotting trumps analysis on the MEE), meaning you are less likely to fake an answer and get credit for it.

You can also write an answer to a question in the MEE Comparison and then compare your answer to other graded answers (I am working on an automated way of doing this). If this is too much effort, you can simply look at passing and above-passing MEEs. For example, one subscriber told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” Put simply, good essays look like other good essays.

Seperac Quick Review Issue Spotting Outline (based on 200+ MEE questions)Click to read more

Click here to see a sample of the Seperac Quick Review Issue Spotting Outline

MEE scores are highly dependant on issue spottting. For example, Essay #3 from the July 2016 MEE (a good issue-spotter Torts essay) dealt with the issues of 'standard of care', 'strict liability', 'products liability' and 'market share liability.' For this Torts essay, I found that examinees that addressed the issues by simply applying the negligence standard of duty, breach, causation and liability generally did not receive above-passing scores, meaning you are less likely to fake an answer and get credit for it. Because the MEE questions are shorter (30 minutes per answer) but still contain 3-4 issues per question, examinees have less time to discuss topics in depth. On the pre-UBE essays, the graders graded the essays more holistically while the MEE graders refer to a point-sheet. Thus, I believe issue-spotting is paramount on the MEE, so I created this MEE Quick Review Issue Spotting outline. Because an MEE question must be answered in 30 minutes, there is less time for an examinee to write a thoughtful analysis that might sway the grader. Instead, the MEE is seemingly designed as a hit-and-run exam where examinees must hit each issue and then simply run to the next one. In such circumstances, if what you say is not on the grader’s checklist, you are not likely to earn points for it. For example, there are passing examinee answers in the MEE Comparison that merely spot all the issues and then have some rules, short analysis and correct conclusions.

I created this Quick Review outline to improve an examinee's MEE issue spotting. The Seperac MEE Quick Review Outline (based on the last 200+ released MEE questions) serves as an excellent way to familiarize yourself with how the MEE questions for each subject are posed, what issues are at play, and what the outcomes are, along with a brief discussion of the answer. For examinees that have practiced essays and are confident their writing and analysis will be satisfactory, this Quick Review enables an examinee to efficiently review a wide range of past MEE essays (most likely the most important ones) and their corresponding issues/answers to improve their issue spotting and knowledge. A sample of this Quick Review outline can be viewed here. In order to learn how to fully utilize this Quick Review outline, please read the introduction section of the outline. For auditory learners, there are also MP3s of this outline. A sample MP3 of the Quick Review outline can be listened to here.

This outline contains every released MEE question from 2002 to 2017 (with the exception of Negotiable Instruments/Commercial Paper questions which are no longer tested on the MEE exam). This outline contains 206 MEE questions on 14 subjects: Agency & Partnership, Civil Procedure, Conflict of Laws, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Corporations & LLCs, Criminal Law & Procedure, Evidence, Family Law, Real Property, Secured Transactions, Torts, Trusts, and Wills & Estates. Please note that MEE testing of the MBE subjects (with the exception of Civil Procedure) only began in July 2007, so there are fewer MEE questions for these subjects.

The MEE questions in this Quick Review Outline are grouped by subject, with the questions sorted from newest to oldest. Examinees should focus on one subject at a time, reading each question from that subject and then attempting to issue spot (either on paper or in your head). The questions and short answers in this outline are separated by a page break so an examinee can read each question without any hint of the answer, and the examinee can then go to the answer explanation on the next page to self-assess. The questions for each subject are sorted from most recent to least recent because I regard the more recent exam questions as more important (much like the recently released MBE questions in the OPE 1-4 exams reflect the current MBE, the recently released MEE questions from 2012-2017 reflect the current MEE).

The Answer Analysis section contains a list of the relevant legal problems tested in the question (which are referred to as “Issues”) along with an answer to each legal problem, and then an Answer Discussion which consists of a brief overview of the answer. The Issue answers are color coded so examinees can quickly determine how the issue was resolved (Red for No, Green for Yes and Blue means Not Applicable). Each Issue reports its assigned score value which provides some insight into how much knowledge and analysis is required for each Issue. For example “POINT 1 (25%)means that this issue was worth 25%  of an examinee’s total score for that essay (and generally should represent about 25% of your writing).

If you go to View from the menu, if you check "Navigation pane" in the Show menu, you will see a hyperlinked navigation pane on the left side of the document. This enables you to quickly jump around between questions. As a word document, the document is editable - you can make this document your own by adding or removing text, increasing the font size, changing the margins, or adding comments, special formatting/highlighting. In addition, examinees can search the document for keywords in the past essay questions and answers. On the Menu/Ribbon, if you go to View, there is a macro button called "Count Words." If you click on the button, a dialog box will ask "What word do you want to count?" Enter a word or a phrase and then press OK.

This MEE Quick Review Issue Spotting Outline serves as a well-organized way to familiarize yourself with how the questions for each subject are posed, what issues are at play, and what the outcomes are, along with a brief discussion of the answer. For examinees that have practiced essays and are confident in their writing and analysis, this MEE Quick Review enables an examinee to efficiently review a wide range of past MEE essays (likely the most important ones) and their corresponding issues/answers to improve their issue spotting and knowledge. In addition, there are MP3s of this outline for each subject on the subscription site. I recommend that examinees alternate between reading this outline and listen to the MP3s of this outline since it is a great way to create different memory impressions in your study.

MEE Question and Answer MP3 Audio Files (34 hours based on last 21 MEE exams)Click to read more

A sample MP3 of a July 2016 MEE Civil Procedure question can be listened to here.

To enable examinees to create auditory memory impressions and better remember the material, I created audio files of the MEE questions and answers. At present, the MP3s cover the last 21 MEE exams (150+ questions) which is about 34 hours of audio. I plan to add MP3s when time permits (it takes some time to correct the grammatical and pronunciation errors in the audio files). If you have never listened to MP3s of the essays, you should give them a try. As one examinee told me: "I realized during this process that I actually am much more of an auditory learner, and I found myself able to focus more and retain more from audio or audio with text than I ever have just by reading.  So the fact that you provide so many audio resources made a big difference for me."

In your studying, you should be continually making active and varied memory impressions. A common way to form different memory impressions is through auditory learning. I generally advise examinees (especially auditory learners) to listen to bar materials while commuting/working out/showering/etc. or if simply want to give your eyes a rest. As one examinee told me: "the MP3s are great when I am tired of reading." Listening to the material forms different memory impressions than reading it, so on the exam if you don’t remember something you read, you may instead recall something you heard. Anytime you cannot actively study, listening to MP3s is a great way to passively study. If you pause the MP3s on occasion and verbalize what you are listening to, you can even convert your passive listening into active studying. I find that listening to MP3s while commuting/working out was helpful because you are a captive audience. If you give the MP3s a try, they can be addictive – as one J16 subscriber who passed told me: "I need the soothing voice of your automated mp3."

At present, there are various MP3s based on the past 21 MEE exams (July 2007 to July 2017). There are MP3s of each individual exam available along with MP3s of each individual question with NCBE answer analysis (150+ questions & answers). A sample MP3 of a July 2016 MEE Civil Procedure question can be listened to here. Put simply, there is no better way to know the exam than the exam itself. Thus, there is no better way of understanding the current MEE than by looking at prior exams, especially the most recent ones. Examinees (especially auditory learners) should use these MP3s when they are commuting/working out/etc. I find that listening to the essays is an effective way to absorb the information, because each different memory impression you form while studying (e.g. listening versus reading) will help you to later recall the information (e.g. if you don’t remember something you read, you may remember something you heard). Thus, if you are an auditory learner (or just want an easy way to study while you are driving/working out etc), the following MP3s are available:

1) Full exam MP3s for the past 21 MEE exams (July 2007 to July 2017). Each MP3 is based on the released NCBE MEE Question and Analyses book for that exam with the following improvements: (i) each Answer Analyses follows the question so you can hear the answer right after listening to the question (in the MEE books, the answers are in a separate section after the questions); (ii) I edited each Answer Analyses to remove any unimportant information (e.g. I removed unnecessary case citations/references that there is no need to listen to – this shortened each Answer Analysis by about 10%); (iii) I listen to the MP3s and fix all the pronunciation errors so the MP3s are highly conducive to auditory learning with minimal disruptions. (iv) I removed any UCC 3 Commercial Paper/Negotiable Instrument questions since they are no longer tested on the MEE. These 15 MP3s consist of 26 hours of audio.

2) Individual MP3s of each MEE Question and Answer Analyses labeled by subject. These MP3s are the exact same MP3s as the ones above, but rather than MP3s of full exams, these are MP3s of each question. Accordingly, if you decide you only want to listen Civil Procedure MP3s (this is the most important subject on the UBE exam and Civil Procedure MEE issues are also frequently tested on the MBE), you can do this. I find these MP3s very helpful because it is like you are listening to a story and then hearing its conclusion.

3) MP3s of the Seperac MEE Quick Review Issue Spotting Outline (which is based on the last 212 released MEE questions). These MP3s (which are by subject) are similar to the MEE Question and Answer Analyses MP3s, but the Answers are significantly shortened to only discuss the issues, the outcomes for each issue, and a brief discussion of the answer. I made this after realizing how important issue-spotting is on the MEE exam.

MEE Comparison Essay BankClick to read more

Subscribers to the MEE Study Module can access the MEE Comparison. For the MEE, I currently have July 2016 MEE essays from about 37 examinees and February 2017 MEE essays from 27 examinees. Following are very small samples of my February and July 2010 MPT comparisons (with explanations):

http://www.seperac.com/Feb2010Analysis/

http://www.seperac.com/examinees/JULY2010/

You can look at exactly passing answers to see how much (or how little) is required for an exactly passing score. Examinees can review examples of the high scoring MEE essays to: (1) see how the high scoring essays are structured (e.g. how they use CIRAC/IRAC, how they address the issues, how they format their answer in regards to issue statements, conclusions and bolding/underlining/italicizing); and (2) see how the high scoring essays properly analyze the issues. When you look at the text comparison, you start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. The PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side) let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers). For example, one examinee (non-subscriber) who failed F15 told me: "I did much better on my essays this time due in large part to your comparison tool. I found that to be extremely helpful." For the F15 exam, this examinee's 5-Essay average was 53.74 (a passing essay average for the Feb 2015 exam was 51.43). Based on 196 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 9/196 (this means the examinee had a 5-Essay average better than 95.4% of the examinees that sent me their Feb 2015 score information). In July 2014, this examinee had a 5-Essay average was 45.22 (a passing essay average for the July 2014 exam was 47.83). Based on 315 submitted score reports, this 5-Essay average was ranked 131/315 (which was better than 58.4% of the examinees that sent me their July 2014 scores).

Examinees that self-evaluate can write an answer to a question in the MEE Comparison and then compare the answer to other graded answers (I am working on an automated way of doing this). If this is too much effort, you can simply look at passing and above-passing MEEs. For example, one subscriber told me: “I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a ‘voice’ in my head when writing essays.” Put simply, good essays look like other good essays.

Other MEE content/material including specific advice on how to use the module properlyClick to read more

Along with general advice on how to study for the MEE, there are also other materials and tools available. For example, there is an MEE Answer Framework built into the MEE Essays Compilation that illustrates how your responses should be framed, an MEE Word Calculator, and an MEE Buzzwords document.

MEE Answer Framework (built into the MEE Essays Compilation)
In examining the released MEE essay answers, there is generally a consistent framework of how a question is answered. In order to get an "above-average" score on the essays, examinees should emulate the structure of the above-average answers. If you can adapt their writing style to the format expected and use the terminology the bar graders are familiar with, you increase your chance of getting a better score. To illustrate, below are marked up versions of 80 released "above-average" MEE essay answers where I highlight in green each time the examinee used an IRAC-type introductory phrase to discuss or analyze an issue. Please note that each of these essays was likely from a different examinee, so these "above-average" essay answers illustrate the IRAC framework of about 80 examinees. I highlight in red each time the examinee referred to a statute, case, law or rule. This shows you what statutes/rules are worthy of mention on the MEE when tested. Finally, in the more recent essays, I highlight in blueeach time the examinee used a "buzz-word" (i.e. relevant legal terminology that illustrates your understanding of the law in question). It is important that you peruse these essays once to understand how the IRAC framework and statute references are used in the highest scoring answers - think of these essays as "blue-prints" of how you should compose your own essay answers.

MEE Word Calculator
You can use this calculator to test what words or phrases appear in the MEE Questions and Answers from February 1995-July 2016 (44 exams). This Calculator is a useful tool for identifying what words are used versus what words are not used on the MEE essays. For example, suppose you wanted to find out how often the phrase "business judgment rule" was used in the MEE questions and answers. The MEE Word Calculator breaks down how many times the phrase appears in the Questions and Answers so you can quickly tell exactly how common the usage of the word/phrase is. The Calculator will also tell you the odds of this word being used in an upcoming exam answer (simply based on how often it appeared in MEE answers in the past). For example, the word "reasonable" appeared in 35% of the MEE answer analyses from 1995-2016 (meaning the word "reasonable" needs to be part of your MEE lexicon). I also created a MEE Word Frequency chart based on this data (it looks at words that are 5 characters in length or greater). This Frequency chart chart serves as a good reminder of the words you can expect to use in your MEE answers. Any word that is a Top-50 word in both the MEE questions and the MEE answers is highlighted in GREEN. Overall, 60% of the Top-50 words are contained in both the MEE questions and the MEE answers, which serves as a reminder that examinees should make an effort to use the terminology from the MEE question in their answer.

MEE Buzzwords
This 6-page SEPERAC MEE BUZZWORDS document that contains the common legal terminology contained in the released NCBE MEE Answer Analyses. Issue-spotting is very important to your MEE score. I have seen examinees write good rules for the wrong issue and receive failing scores. I strongly believe the graders look at the NCBE Answer Analysis when grading and if what you wrote is not contained in it, you don’t receive credit. For example, I picked the 50 most relevant words in the NCBE answer analysis for each question from the J16 and F17 MEE and then averaged the scores of the examinees that used the word versus the examinees that didn’t use it. Examinees that used the words had much better outcomes score-wise than examinees that didn’t use the words.

Please note that this is by no means an all-inclusive list – it is simply a list of common legal terminology used in past MEE answers. One day I will make a more "all-inclusive" list, but this smaller list should still help you on the upcoming MEE exam. There is no special grouping to the buzzwords – they are simply sorted in alphabetical order. Examinees should make these words part of their MEE lexicon. Then, on the exam, if any of this terminology applies to a specific MEE issue, you should use this specific legal terminology in your MEE answer. Worst case, if you have no idea how to answer an issue, start using these buzzwords as they can serve as a loose map of how to answer the issue. For example, if there is an Agency issue, start by referring to "RUPA" and then identify some "acts" and then discuss how "apparent authority" and "actual authority" apply and whether the "principal" is a "disclosed principal" and whether there has been a "ratification," etc.

How To Use the MEE Study Module

Subscribers should first read the module in its entirety. Please note that more detailed explanations are contained in blue linked sections that expand/collapse. If the exam is more than a month away, you should read these explanations, but if the exam is less than one month away, you should ignore the hidden blue linked sections. Examinees can utilize the materials on this site as they wish, but I suggest that examinees begin with the MEE Quick Review outline to develop their MEE issue spotting ability. I regard issue-spotting as the most important aspect of the MEE and this outline will help improve your MEE issue spotting. You should read a question, write down the issues you come up with, and then check your answers. The Reviewing/Outlining Released MEE Essays section explains how to do this. Then repeat for at least 100 questions. If you are limited on time or you are an auditory learner, use the MP3s of the Quick Review outline instead (or mix up your study by using both). Once you become familiar with the past tested MEE issues, use the use the MEE Essay Compilation to start your MEE study and practice/review. This Compilation is 1,432 pages long consisting of 309 MEE Questions, 309 NCBE Answer Analyses (sorted by subject to enable easier studying, testing and review) that correspond to those questions, and 86 top-scoring examinee essays that are color coded to illustrate IRAC, issue spotting terminology and case/law citations. Start with the 2015 MEE questions (yes, that is correct - the 2016 to 2017 MEEs are lower priority) and work your way back. Reviewing the full NCBE Answers will improve your MEE analysis ability. If you commute/work out (or just get sick of reading), listen to the MP3s based on full MEE Exams. Here you can study more passively by listening (which will form different memory impressions to aid in recollection), but also try to occasionally actively study by trying to issue-spot in your head after you listen to a question. Next, review the MEE Essay Comparison to better understand how actual MEE answers are scored (while Model Answers are great to learn from, they are unrealistic examples of typical examinee answers). You should compare high-scoring MEEs to one another to see what to strive for, then look at exactly passing answers to understand the bare minimum you need to write so your MEE score does not hurt you, and finally, you should look at the really low scoring answers as examples of what not to do. When you look at the text comparison, you will start to see the commonality in language with high scoring answers – in a sense this trains you to include the same language in similar essays. When you look at the PDF comparisons (where you view the actual PDFs of the answers side by side), this will let you see each essay’s layout, structure, and formatting so you can visually learn how to emulate the high scoring answers (and conversely, avoid the styles of the low scoring answers the graders regarded as poor). Before you begin answering MEEs in practice, read the Grading your practice MEE answers section. If you ever wonder how often something is tested on the MEE, use the MEE Word Calculator to quickly research it. Finally, about a week before the exam, download and start reviewing the MEE Buzzwords document. As simplistic as it may seem, using the appropriate terminology in your answers is important to your MEE score (or worst case, it can help you cobble together a plausible response). Finally, you should re-check this page every so often for new announcements from the time you subscribed (especially as it gets closer to the exam) since I post updates to materials/advice.

Subscriptions to the MEE STUDY MODULE are now available. The cost for access to this module until March 1, 2018 is $175. Please note that this module does NOT contain the UBE MASTER outline or my MBE-MEE subject matter outlines. Furthermore, while content on the full subscription site contains topic priorities for the upcoming exam, the materials available on the MEE Study page do NOT contain any such priorities. Lastly, please note that the MEE Study module is based solely on the released MEE questions, so you will find questions related to the MBE subjects to be under-represented (except for Civil Procedure, the MBE subjects have only been tested on the MEE since 2007 so there is a smaller pool of past questions).

   


Please note that this module does NOT contain the UBE MASTER outline (which becomes available on the full subscription site in December 2017). Furthermore, while content on the full subscription site contains topic priorities for the upcoming exam, the material in this module does NOT contain any such priorities. Please make sure to review the samples of the available materials before you subscribe.

For examinees interested in a quid pro quo, I am offering a $30 coupon code to any examinee who agrees to complete my post-exam followup form within one week after taking the February 2018 UBE exam. The current version of the post-exam form is here. This post-exam followup form enables me assess the effectiveness of my materials while also helping you later if you fail the exam. For example, using this information, I track the key details of your attempt, so if you fail, I will try to match your responses/statistics to whoever previously submitted the most comparable details (and later passed) to give you their advice on what worked for them. To agree to this quid pro quo, simply purchase a subscription from the subscription page and use the following code for the $30 discount: YESTOPOSTEXAMFORM

Then, after the exam, simply complete the form. I will follow up to remind subscribers, particularily if an examinee fails to submit the form within the agreed upon deadline of seven days.

 

FULL SUBSCRIPTION SITE (available mid-December 2017)

The full subscription site centers around a simple premise – examinees that do well on the MBE generally pass. I provide advice on how to approach the exam more effectively along with helpful materials to achieve that goal. Thus, subscribers focus heavily on the MBE and take calculated risks with their MEE/MPT study based on the advice/materials on the subscription site. The advice on the full subscription site is very specific. For example, I provide very comprehensive MBE, MEE and MPT Strategy pages that are based on years of essay/MPT review and examinee follow-ups. Any question you may have about the full subscription site should be answered here. Comments from hundreds of subscribers are here. Subscribers should use the UBE MASTER outline as their bible.

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I strongly believe there is no better representation of the current MBE than this outline in as condensed a format. Thus, if there is a part of the outline you don’t understand pertaining to an MBE issue, you must review/research it to understand it. The MBE tests both past topics and new current topics and this outline is intended to help you with both. The past MBE topics are reflected in the built-in MBE rules (I wrote synopses of the law for each of the 1,600+ released NCBE questions – these are the same questions in Adaptibar/Strategies & Tactics, Barmax, etc). The past topics and new current topics are reflected in the black letter law sections of the outline. I devote one page of black letter law (font size of 10) to what I expect to represent one MBE question on the exam. Thus, there are 175 pages of black letter law for the 7 MBE subjects, plus the built in MBE and MEE issues. The past topics and new current topics are also reflected in the built-in MEE issues (over past 400 MEE issues related to the 7 MBE subjects). What I have discovered is that MEE issues have been turned into MBE questions (especially with Civil Procedure). Accordingly, knowing the past tested MEE issues will help you on the MBE. Finally, the outline is highly prioritized. It is sorted by subject based on how much each subject is expected to contribute to your final score (both in context of the MBE and MEE). It is further prioritized by category so that you study the MEE topics expected to be repeated before you study any MEE topics not expected to be repeated. Put simply, if you know this outline well, you should score well on the MBE and significantly increase your odds of passing the exam.


Much like the advice on this page is derived from examinee statistics, the advice on the full subscription site is derived from more in-depth examinee statistics along with data such as graded examinee essays and post-exam follow-ups. The main purpose of the full subscription site (e.g. using the UBE MASTER outline and relying on the priorities) is to efficiently abbreviate your MBE/MEE study so that examinees can divert that extra time to MBE study/practice. This can be a cause for both anxiety and relief. For example, one examinee recently told me "Just focusing on MBE, through a bit scary psychologically, at the same time I feel eased because have a direction." However, this strategy is very effective if examinees can score high enough on the MBE.

If an at-risk examinee passes the exam due to the subscription site, it is generally because they devote more time to the MBE at the expense of the MEE by taking a calculated risk on what MEE topics will appear through the UBE MASTER priorities. By having a higher than expected MBE score (and doing OK on the essays/MPT), these examinees are more likely to pass than by bringing up their MEE/MPT scores and having an MBE score that is average for their demographic. This may not work for everyone, but it has helped a number of examinees, as they comment here. No matter what your background is, whether the subscription site will be enough to help you pass, I don't know, but I strongly believe it will give you your best opportunity at passing. For example, the UBE MASTER OUTLINE contains about 175 pages of black letter law on the 7 MBE subjects and I expect you to find all 175 pages of law in this outline fully relevant to the upcoming MBE. Thus, these 175 pages of content (plus another 100 pages of past MBE/MEE issues related to the MBE subjects) can essentially account for about 60-70% of your total UBE score. After the exam, I urge examinees to go back to the UBE MASTER outline to spot the issues and assess the outline's usefulness. In addition, post-exam analysis of how each MASTER version performed in regards to the essays can be viewed here.

As a repeat examinee who passed July 2017 with an MBE of 142 told me: "Clearly, the MBE is the ticket to passing this exam and what I attribute to passing. I dispensed with trying to master every single rule and used your material to narrow down law most likely to be tested, based on your master outline. Your method of analysis helps to filter out unnecessary information and gets to the critical points in a concise manner. It helped me focus my attention and get the points I needed to pass. Had I done this sooner, I would have likely saved myself a lot of time, heartbreak, and money. But, I am so grateful to be here now."

Other modules (e.g. MBE-MEE OUTLINE module) will be added when completed. If interested, I suggest you fill out the Email Notification List below to receive notifications of updates.

Regardless as to whether you subscribe, I have a post-exam questionnaire for examinees:
http://seperac.com/postexamform.php

If you take the exam and think you may not have passed, filling out this form immediately after you take the exam (while the information is still fresh in your mind) can help you later. For example, using this information, I track the key details of your attempt, so if you later find that you failed the exam, I will try to match your responses/statistics to whoever previously submitted the most comparable details (and later passed) to give you their advice on what worked for them.

In addition, the Seperac UBE Score Estimator will give you a good idea of your odds of passing based on the demographic and grade information you enter.

Email Notification List

If you want to be put on the FEBRUARY 2018 email notification list, please submit your name and email address below. To anyone on the list, I will send out email updates between August 2017-February 2018 based on the following events: (1) enrollment to the subscription site for the February 2018 exam opens; (2) new modules are available; (3) coupon codes are issued for a module; (4) the UBE MASTER outline is released; and (5) tutoring enrollment. Please note that this is merely a notification list - it is not a waiting list.

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If you have any questions, email me at joe@seperac.com.


 
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