Seperac July 2019 MBE subscription modules

I primarily tutor and work with UBE repeaters through my UBE Course which is intended for examinees who have been unable to succeed with conventional bar reviews and/or tutoring. If you are a first-time taker, I generally suggest you stick with your bar review course unless you are statistically at-risk of failing. Please enter your information into my UBE Score Estimator to determine whether you may be at-risk. If the calculator estimates you to pass by 20+ points, you are likely fine just using the materials from your bar review (unless you are doing something atypical such as studying part-time). The materials on www.mberules.com are based on my tutoring materials and intended to supplement MBE study for at-risk examinees.

July 2019 MBE module subscriptions on www.mberules.com are now available. The MBE Outlines module ($250) consists of a 175 page black letter law MBE outline in PDF format which is keyed to the 2019 NCBE Subject Matter Outline. I regard this outline as an excellent representation (both proportionally and contentually) of the current MBE. For example, an CA examinee who scored a 160.6 on the J18 MBE told me “Your outline is excellent and serves as a great equalizer since the questions on Adaptibar are not fully reflective of the exam.” The MBE Rules module ($250) consists of rule statements I wrote for each and every released NCBE question (1,800+ rules) in PDF and MP3 format. Subscribers typically rank my MBE Rules outline as 2nd or 3rd most helpful in their MBE studies (the UBE MASTER outline is ranked most helpful, but this is only available through my UBE Course). For example, as one examinee recently told me: “Knowing now that I passed, I can confidently say that your MBE Rules outline was indispensable. Even though I probably completed only 400-500 practice MBEs, I really focused on thinking about why I got answers wrong, what aspect of the law I didn’t quite understand, and creating rules that directly addressed that misunderstanding. I then reviewed these rules multiple times.” Put simply, if you do not review the law behind the released NCBE questions, you disadvantage yourself on the MBE. Finally, the Combined MBE Outline module ($400) consists of an outline that merges the 175 page black letter law MBE outline with my MBE rules, creating a 285 page outline with the past NCBE MBE Rules appropriately categorized. The best way to understand the benefits of each of these outlines is to look at the samples on www.mberules.com

 

Seperac July 2019 MEE/MPT Subscriptions

I also offer a UBE Essays subscription module that is specifically for the July 2019 MEE/MPT. This is a stand alone subscription module that is specifically for the written portion of the exam and contains all the available MEE exams with answers, comparison banks containing thousands of actual graded examinee MEE and MPT essays, MEE audio MP3s, an MEE Issue Spotting outline and an MPT Format Bible. July 2019 UBE Essays subscriptions on www.ubeessays.com are now available (please note the materials will be updated when the Feb 2019 MEE essays are released). There is also an option to purchase the combined MBE and MEE/MPT subscriptions at a discounted price here.

Seperac UBE Course

The Seperac UBE Course is intended for examinees who were unsuccessful with traditional bar review courses and/or tutors. The UBE Course essentially merges my comprehensive subscription with my tutoring program. The Seperac July 2019 UBE Course will commence on May 13, 2019. Starting April 1, 2019, any examinee who enrolls in the UBE Course will have access to the Early UBE Course site. This Early site acts as a waiting room for the Seperac UBE Course which contains (1) an Early Study Time Allocation section that tells examinees exactly how to allocate their early study time; (2) an Early Study Materials section that provides examinees on-point and up-to-date materials to enable efficient early study; and (3) an Early Study Advice section that gives examinees advice to how to avoid the most common mistakes made by failing examinees.

Click here to read more about the Seperac UBE Course


This new UBE Course is a major shift from what I previously made available to non-tutees. From 2008-2016, I offered a single online subscription consisting of advice and materials for the New York bar exam. A good percentage of subscriber comments here (https://seperac.com/comments.php) are based on this 2008-2016 subscription. This subscription did not involve any tutoring which I did separately. With the introduction of the UBE exam to New York in July 2016, I split the online subscription into separate modules for the MBE, MEE and MPT. While I have always tolerated some examinees sharing my materials, the scale of the sharing/stealing of my materials/priorities over the next two years by examinees (and others) was unprecedented – one newer bar review even directly copied my MEE Issue Spotting outline but made small changes to avoid infringement. Since I put a great deal of effort into trying to understand/represent the exam, having my materials exploited in such a way seriously undermines my work and the materials’ effectiveness.

In contrast, I have tutored for the past 10 years and have never had a single problem with any tutee sharing my tutoring materials. This is because there is an initial vetting process where I confirm each tutee’s identity after which they sign a comprehensive NDA before anything is provided to them. I also release the most important information in a format which is harder to copy (MP3) and it contains content unique to each tutee for tracking purposes (which is one reason why I limit UBE Course enrollment to 15 examinees per exam). Thus, I am now putting the majority of my time and energy (and accompanying materials/priorities/advice) into the success of the tutees enrolled in the UBE Course and making my materials available exclusively to them.

Accordingly, starting with the Feb 2019 exam, my comprehensive subscription merged with my tutoring program. This new UBE Course consists of the same online materials which were available through the comprehensive subscription along with other more specific materials I previously provided only to tutees. The UBE Course includes personal tutoring with me to ensure examinees are utilizing the materials properly and studying/progressing efficiently. The UBE Course is intended for examinees who have been unable to succeed with conventional bar reviews and/or tutoring. I also work with examinees who have a high statistical likelihood of failing on their first attempt (e.g. part-time studiers and foreign examinees). If you compare me to other bar reviews, I am somewhat unconventional. For example, I promote taking calculated risks and studying based on priorities I establish for each of the 367 testable MBE and MEE categories. I find that at-risk candidates usually can’t absorb/process all the information a conventional bar review gives them, so I focus on cutting out whatever I regard as superfluous for the upcoming exam (e.g. see https://www.seperac.com/analysis_ube.php) while giving these examinees the information I expect to be tested, usually with good results.

As such, the UBE Course is not a typical bar review where the instruction is foundational and from the perspective that this is your first time encountering the information. My approach is more specific and focuses on the topics I expect to appear on the upcoming exam, so you are essentially taking calculated risks and will lack some of the foundational instruction you would receive from a standard bar review. Accordingly, even with the UBE Course materials and tutoring, I cannot guarantee you will pass, but I can guarantee that you will never see a better representation of what to expect on the upcoming exam.

Thus, the Seperac UBE Course is specifically intended for examinees who have a high statistical likelihood of failing (repeaters, part-time studiers and foreign examinees). Examinees who fail usually don't approach the exam the correct way (in both study and practice). To compound things, it becomes harder and harder to pass the bar exam with each attempt. Statistically, the performance of exam “repeaters” is considerably lower than the performance of first-time exam takers. For example, in 2007, New York released a paper entitled "Impact of the Increase in the Passing Score on the New York Bar Examination July 2005 Bar Administration" (see http://www.nybarexam.org/press/ncberep.pdf, pages 83, 90-91). According to the study, the projected pass rate for Domestic-Educated First-Time Takers was 83%; the projected pass rate for Domestic-Educated Second-Time Takers was 30%; and the projected pass rate for Domestic-Educated Third-Time Takers was 23.2%. Meanwhile, the projected pass rate for Foreign-Educated First-Time Takers was 43.9% while the projected pass rate for Foreign-Educated Repeaters was 13.5% (id. at pages 95, 98). As you can see, pass rates plummet for re-takers, even for the ones most likely to pass, namely Domestic-Educated takers. I believe this is because failing examinees continue to repeat the same mistakes. For some students, passing the bar is easy, while others have a real problem with the bar. Those students aren’t necessarily inept or lazy, but they don’t standardize test well and they study inefficiently (e.g. pointlessly trying to memorize all the information rather than prioritizing it). Inefficient study affects all examinees, but it most seriously impacts at-risk examinees. I regard an at-risk examinee as one who is statistically more likely to fail the exam than pass it. At risk-examinees include all repeat takers and most part-time studiers. I made a UBE Score Estimator (which is primarily based on NYBOLE/NCBE studies) so examinees can predict an estimate of their total UBE score based on the entered demographic/grade data. The further away you are from passing, the fewer inefficiencies you can have in your studies. For example, a Domestic-educated Caucasian First-Time examinee with a high LSAT/LGPA can study rather inefficiently (e.g. not study full-time, put a lower percentage of their time into MBE study, or answer MBE practice questions from only one source, or answer only a few hundred MBE questions in practice) and still pass the exam. In contrast, if you are on the other end of the spectrum (Foreign-educated Non-Caucasian Repeat-Taker), you can’t afford any inefficiencies in your studies.

The UBE Course is limited to 15 tutees. The cost for the Seperac J19 UBE Course is U.S. $5,000.00. Anything you paid for prior subscriptions will be credited towards the UBE Course tuition fee. For example, if you paid $800 for past subscriptions, the UBE Course will cost $4,200. Please note that this is a one-time discount and I reserve the right to terminate this discount at any time prior to enrollment. The Seperac July 2019 UBE Course will commence on May 13, 2019. Starting April 1, 2019, any examinee who enrolls in the UBE Course will have access to the Early UBE Course site. This Early site acts as a waiting room for the Seperac UBE Course which contains (1) an Early Study Time Allocation section that tells examinees exactly how to allocate their early study time; (2) an Early Study Materials section that provides examinees with MBE, MEE and MPT materials for their early study; and (3) an Early Study Advice section that offers advice to how to avoid the most common mistakes I find that failing examinees make.

Again, please keep in mind that this is not a conventional bar review course nor does it provide the same level of structure that a standard bar review provides. Accordingly, if you are a first time examinee, unless you are at-risk of failing for some reason (e.g. foreign examinee, domestic T-3/T-4 with low GPA, or part-time studier), you should take a conventional bar review instead. Most first time examinees study full-time for about 60 days using Themis, Barbri or Kaplan. They generally follow the course structure but also go off course if they think they need to. In New York over the past 20 years, the July ABA First-Timers Pass Rate is 86% while the February ABA First-Timers Pass Rate is 74%. Therefore, most first time examinees who follow this conventional route of study will pass the exam on their first attempt. In contrast to standard bar reviews, I promote taking calculated risks and studying based on priorities I establish for each of the 367 testable MBE and MEE categories. I find that examinees that fail usually can’t absorb/process all the information a conventional bar review gives them, so I focus on cutting out whatever I regard as superfluous for the upcoming exam while giving these examinees the information I expect to be tested (usually with good results). Thus, rather than trying to decipher what is important to know for the upcoming exam based on the mountain of materials you have, I tell you exactly what is important to know for the MBE, MEE and MPT. This approach has brought success to a large number of examinees, as detailed here. I have enough confidence in what I do that I have been tracking the accuracy of my priorities for the past ten years (the last 22 exams from 2008 to present). This Post-Exam Analysis page also explains how my MEE prioritization approach works.

Almost all of the UBE Course materials are prioritized. Unlike other bar reviews, I don’t give you everything – I only give you what I regard as important for the upcoming exam. I also highlight sections for you to identify what I regard as critical. For example, for the MEE, I use statistical analysis to prioritize the testable MEE categories and designate about 1/3 as HIGH priority, 1/3 as MEDIUM priority, and 1/3 as LOW priority. Thus, while most examinees will study all the testable MEE areas, UBE Course tutees focus on the HIGH priority MEE categories (which usually represent only 30% of the testable categories) and these categories have typically represented over 50% of an examinee's overall MEE score. More importantly, UBE Course tutees generally put very little time into the LOW priority categories (which represent over 40% of the MEE categories), and in doing so, it only affects about 16% of their overall MEE score. This gives examinees the time to focus more time on the MBE by having the power to take calculated risks on the MEE and ignore almost 50% of the MEE categories (while greatly minimizing the danger of employing such a strategy).

Put simply, I have spent the last fifteen years trying to figure out the bar exam. In that time, I've collected thousands of law books and outlines, followed-up with with thousands of examinees, and analyzed thousands of scores & essays. As Harry Houdini once said: "The real secret to my success is simple: I work from seven in the morning to midnight and I like it." I pride myself on understanding the UBE and MBE better than anyone else and this is reflected in my materials and advice. Over the years, I have personally worked with thousands of examinees, examined thousands of score reports, and reviewed thousands of graded essays and MPTs. I explain here how I've acquired over 2,000 law looks and over 50,000 outlines to create a bar exam database. To me, the bar exam is a puzzle that can be solved if someone is willing to take the time to find all the scattered pieces and put them together. For example, by collecting a large number of examinee scores and then determining the essay/MBE scales allows me to give exam strategy advice. Comments and testimonials from subscribers who passed with my materials are here.

While most bar review courses have a standardized approach to the bar exam, my approach is data driven. Therefore, while Barbri/Themis/Kaplan simply tell you to study everything, I put a significant amount of effort into assessing what may or may not appear on the upcoming exam. Basically, when you hire a tutor, you pay for his time with you. With me, you somewhat pay for my time but even more so, you pay for my research. With each exam, I put a significant amount of my time into researching past exams to tell you very accurately what to expect on it. A standard tutor can help you to understand things you don’t understand, but what’s the point if those concepts are no longer tested or statistically not expected to appear on the upcoming exam. When this occurs, you are studying inefficiently. Examinees who follow my methodologies put a disproportionate amount of their study-time into the MBE by following my materials/study-time allocations and take calculated risks on the MEE and MPT using my materials/priorities/predictions and advice. This is what I find that works for at-risk examinees. Otherwise, they try to be good at everything and their scores will see-saw but they will fail again. Whether the Seperac UBE Course will be enough to help you pass, I don't know, but I strongly believe it will give you your best opportunity at passing. Put simply, if you previously had bar review or tutor regret, you will not regret taking this UBE Course.

If you know me, you know I go to great lengths to explain things. As such, I also have a very comprehensive explanation of exactly what this new Seperac UBE Course consists of, but I am being somewhat cryptic about it (especially in regards to the tutoring aspect) until you sign an NDA since it involves proprietary methods and materials. For example, I provide UBE Course tutees with a weekly 24 page MBE practice analysis report which contains a wealth of useful information. Accordingly, if you are interested in learning more (and viewing samples of UBE Course materials), the next step would be to email me your unredacted past score reports and/or exam application receipts so I can verify your examinee status and prepare a preliminary NDA. If you don’t have any past exam score sheets or your current UBE application receipt,  please email me from your work email account (no anonymous email accounts) with your telephone number and Linkedin profile information. If you are unable to do any of the above, you are likely a first-time examinee who is much better off with a conventional bar review course.

I have been tutoring for ten years and I regard the UBE Course as an effective combination of tutoring and exam information (once again, I can better reassure you after the NDA). If you previously taken a bar review or tutored, I can promise you that you will find yourself much better prepared for the upcoming exam (especially the MBE) as compared with anything else you previously tried. With much fewer students, I hope to see each and every one pass.

If you find that the UBE Course is beyond your needs, I offer smaller modules of helpful materials, but they are more generic and do not contain any of the priorities or predictions that are included in the UBE Course. You can visit https://mberules.com/ or https://ubeessays.com/ to learn more about these modules. These modules can be regarded as gap-fillers. For example, as far as I know, no one has written short synopsisis of the 1,800+ released NCBE MBE questions (this is my MBE Rules outline). In this outline I organize the rules by category (175 MBE categories) and prioritize them (more recent rules listed first and more comprehensive and oldest rules listed last and less comprehensive). I also created MP3s of these 1800+ rules you can create multiple memory impressioins and study in places like the gym or car. I further divide the rules based on OPE rules (NCBE questions from 2006 or later) and non-OPE rules (from 1998 and earlier). The same can be said for the other modules. For example, one CA examinee who scored a 160.6 on the J18 MBE recently told me: “Your outline is excellent and serves as a great equalizer since the questions on Adaptibar are not fully reflective of the exam.” This MBE Outlines module ($250) consists of a 175 page black letter law MBE outline in PDF format which is keyed to the 2019 NCBE Subject Matter Outline. I regard this outline as an excellent representation (both proportionally and contentually) of the current MBE. Likewise, the UBE Essays subscription will give you a lot of insight into what is required on the MEE and MPT. The subscription includes the licensed MEEs, but I transform them into more efficient study tools such as condensed outlines, comparison banks and MP3s.

Please keep in mind the available component modules (i.e. UBE Essays and MBE Rules) do NOT contain any topic priorities. Any material I produce which prioritizes/predicts upcoming exam topics such as my UBE MASTER Outline or Top 50 MEE outline is only available through the UBE Course. This is because I now regard any uncontrolled publication of my MBE/MEE priorities as observably counter-productive. For example, since stopping the open subscriptions in F19, my MEE priorities appear to be back on track. I had maintained a full course open subscription for 20 administrations (2008-2018), so it bothers me to have to switch to a closed course, but this is truly an example of where a few bad apples spoiled it for the bunch.

If you are contemplating the UBE Course, aside from the fact that these modules will give you a good introduction to my materials and approach to the exam, the amount paid for the subscription modules will be credited if you later decide to sign up for the UBE course. For example, if you purchase the J19 Combined MBE Outline + UBE Essays Modules for $500 in late-April 2019 but fail the J19 exam, if you decide to enroll in the F20 UBE Course, it will be discounted by the $500 you paid. Please further note that to enroll in the UBE course, you must provide me with information to verify your examinee status and also sign a comprehensive Non-Disclosure Agreement. If you are unwilling to do this, you should not sign up or purchase any subscriptions with the expectation of a later credit.


If you are interested in learning more about the July 2019 UBE Course, the first step would be to email me at joe [@] seperac.com. I will then explain the UBE Course in more detail and answer any additional questions you may have. If I determine that the course will be a good fit for you, I will then send you more details about the UBE Course and how to sign up. I also tutor subject to availability.

I also offer a number of free materials/services such as MBE Outlines, MP3s, Score and Essay Analysis Reports, and online Score Calculators/Estimators (see below).


FREE BAR MATERIALS, TOOLS AND SERVICES

I also provide the following free materials/tools/services to bar examinees:

SCORE ANALYSIS REPORT: If you failed the UBE exam, I can provide you with a free 15 page confidential analysis of your scoring along with my advice. I've helped over 4,500 examinees with these free analysis reports.

MEE/MPT ANALYSIS REPORT: If you also have your written answers, I can provide you with a free 45 page MEE/MPT Analysis which will tell you a number of useful things such as how well you issue spotted. More information regarding this report is here.

POST-EXAM ANALYSIS: If you recently took the UBE exam and think you may not have passed, there is a post-exam form for examinees. Filling out this form immediately after you take the exam (while the information is still fresh in your mind) can help you later. For example, using this information, I track the key details of your attempt, so if you later find that you failed the exam, I will try to match your responses/statistics to whoever previously submitted the most comparable details (and later passed) to give you their advice on what worked for them.

UBE SCORE ESTIMATOR: The Seperac UBE Score Estimator will give you a good idea of your odds of passing based on the demographic and grade information you enter.

BAR EXAM SCORE CALCULATORS: I create accurate score calculators based on prior exams to allow examinees to test various scoring scenarios and estimate their upcoming exam performance (e.g. if you are sitting for the J18 exam, you should experiment with the J17 calculator).

MBE SUBSCORE ANALYSIS: If you are in a non-UBE state (e.g. California), while I can't send you a score report, I can give you a breakdown of your MBE subscores.

MBE OUTLINES: My old black letter law MBE outlines from 2005 (I scored a 162 on the MBE largely due to these outlines) can be downloaded here. While a lot has changed with the MBE since 2005, the core information is still relevant.

MEE MP3s: A free sample set of MP3s from the February 2008 MEE can be downloaded here. Additional MP3s wiill be added as time permits. The UBE Essays subscription contains 36 hours of MP3 audio files covering the last 200+ MEE questions and NCBE Answer Analyses (from July 2007 to Feb 2018). Every examinee should listen to MP3s during their studies to see if they find an auditory learning style effective. However, even if you are not an auditory learner, you should take advantage of these MP3s to form different memory impressions when you study.


If you failed the exam

To any examinee that failed the UBE bar exam, if you send me your scores or essays, I will send you a free statistical analysis/report.

I see first-hand the difficulties that retakers face. Accordingly, whenever a failing examinee asks me for advice, I give it. I have received 20,000+ emails from examinees over the past 10 years and I have answered every single email (I strongly believe in the maxim that when one teaches, two learn). However, depending on how busy I am, I may not respond for a few weeks. If you would like my advice, please fill out the Retaker Bar Exam Advice Form. The form is an efficient way for me to determine as much of your situation as possible to formulate an appropriate response. The form contains a set of questions that I generally ask people who email me for advice. As with anything, the more data I have, the more effective my analysis. Once I review your information, I will give you my honest opinion about what I think you should do for your next attempt. For example, a failing J16 examinee who passed in F17 told me: "Your analysis and advice was instrumental for my retake in February 2017 and I found out I passed last week by 7 points after failing by 11 pts in July 2016! All in all, an 18 point swing while working full time and studying part time! The pass rate in my state was 40%. Thanks for all your help and analysis!" While the score reports are fairly self explanatory, I will also give you my analysis of your scores. Anyone who submits scores will have complete anonymity - I only disclose the data itself. The data also enables me to update the Bar Exam Calculators that I routinely improve upon.

You will find the free score report very helpful in pinpointing your problem areas. As one examinee put it: “I have never had such a comprehensive analysis of my results. Even when I took the first bar review course and paid for a one on one tutor, everything pales compared to you.” As such, if you are interested in receiving this free analysis, please complete the following Score Analysis form (or just email me the past grading sheets). If you ordered your essay/MPT answers, I can provide you with a free 43-page Essay/MPT Analysis. For more information on the free score analysis report or essay analysis report is below. The more information you give me, the better advice I can give you about what to do on your next attempt. I have looked at many failing examinee scores and tracked their outcomes so I can probably give you some useful advice. All information submitted is treated confidentially.

Score Analysis Report
If you email me your score report(s), I will email you a free comprehensive 12-14 page analysis of your score and my advice. Please fill out the online submission form or email me a copy of your score report to joe@seperac.com. Click here to view a sample score analysis.* If you submit your scores or essays to me, any identifying information will be redacted and your identity will always be strictly confidential. In the past ten years, I have sent free score reports to over 4,500 examinees encompassing the July 2008 - July 2017 exams. The analysis is extremely useful in pinpointing your problem areas and assessing your future exam performance. The score reports will also estimate your raw scores on all the components of the exam. I continually improve this report with the data I collect - it started as a 1-page report and has grown by about 1 page per year as I obtain/collect more useful data to report. Please note that it may take a week or more to receive an analysis if your score report is sent to me immediately after scores are released.

Score Report
NOTE: Now that NCBE is releasing MBE sub-scores again (starting F17), the Score Analysis will tell you exactly where you had problems on the exam. The chart of your WORST to best exam items (based on how many UBE points away from passing) calculates how much each discrete section of the exam contributed to your total score and then sorts the sections from worst to best. You can use this information to guide your study by putting more effort into your worst areas. Furthermore, the ESTIMATED RAW MBE SCORES chart will estimate your MBE % correct which you can use to assess the effectiveness of your MBE practice questions (e.g. if you scored 70% correct in practice on Civil Procedure MBE questions but only 40% correct on the exam, you should find a new source of Civil Procedure MBE practice questions).

Essay Report

MEE/MPT Analysis Report
I examine UBE bar exam MEEs/MPTs using the same methodology as the score analysis. I strongly urge all failing examinees to order their essays from NY BOLE immediately after scores are released in order to review your essay and MPT answers. You disadvantage yourself if you do not order and review your essays because you will not know what mistakes to correct (e.g. did you miss obvious issues, was your writing style poor or careless, how did your answers compare to the released above average answers). In the past six years, I have sent free MEE/MPT analysis reports to over 600+ examinees encompassing over 3,000 Essays/600 MPTs from the Feb 2010 - July 2017 exams. This 43 page analysis reports statistics such as words, characters, paragraphs, sentences, sentences per paragraph, words per sentence, characters per word, Flesch reading ease, and Flesch-Kincaid grade level. The analysis illustrates how your answers statistically differ from the released above average answers and other examinee essays. The essays/MPTs are examined against the released above average essays/MPTs and the essays/MPTs of other failing examinees and exemplar essays/MPTs. I also analyze word frequencies and report any useful data.

For example, for each essay/MPT, the analysis will report the top 20 words that the above average answers used that you did not or the top 15 words in the question that both above average answers used that you did not. Examinee essays are also compared to the highest scoring essay I received. For example, one comparison reports the top 10 words the best answer used that the examinee did not. The analysis report will statistically compare your MEE/MPT answers to other examinees and it will help show you if your MEE problems were due to issue spotting (look at the sample report to see what I mean by this). If you have your handwritten or typed essays/MPT in PDF format and would like to receive an analysis, please email them to joe@seperac.com along with your score report. If you submit your essays for this analysis, while the essays are used for comparison purposes, any identifying information will be redacted and the identity of the essay writer will be confidential. Please note that it may take two weeks or more to receive an analysis if your essays are sent to me immediately after the exam results are released. A detailed explanation of the analysis is below

Click here to read more about this


The information in the analysis will help you improve your overall written score. The analysis illustrates how your answers statistically differ from the released above average answers and other examinee essays, including the highest scoring examinee essay I receive. For example, one portion of the analysis reports the top 10 words this best answer used that you did not.  For MPTs, one portion of the analysis reports the Top 20 words in the MPT Drafter's Point Sheet that you did not use or the Top 15 words in the Question (File and Library) that both released answers used but you did not.

I significantly revised the MEE/MPT Analysis to compare examinee essays to the NBCE answers. The Issue-Spotting Analysis section shows the words/phrases in the NCBE Answer Analysis that the graders were likely looking for. To make this analysis, I examine the NCBE Answer Analysis for each question (the same one that is in the MEE Essay Compilation) and then I extract the top 50 words/phrases that I expect the graders to look for in the examinee answers. I then report the top 25 (the ones that lead to the best examinee scores). The 'With Word' column reports how many examinees used that word along with the average points these examinees received (green is above passing while red is below passing). For example, for Essay #1 of the Feb 2017 MEE, about 21% of examinees used the word/phrase 'terminate' and received an average of 24.8 points for their essays (whereas a passing MEE essay received 13.3 points). The W/O Word column shows the average essay points for the examinees who did not use that particular word or phrase. Often, the average score for such examinees is below passing, demonstrating the importance of issue spotting and keywords in achieving a passing MEE score. In the prior example, for the 79% of examinees who did not use the word/phrase 'terminate' in their answers, these examinees averaged 13.7 points on the essay. The "You" column reports which of the words/phrases you used in your answer (highlighted in Yellow).

From examining this Issue-Spotting Analysis, you will see that issue spotting and using the correct terminology (i.e. buzzwords) is important on the MEE. For example, below is part of my analysis of Essay #3 (Family Law) on the F17 MEE. Often, when examinees use the same terminology that is contained in the NCBE Answer Analysis, the average score is above passing (of course this also likely means the examinees correctly analyzed and concluded). For example, for Essay #3 of the Feb 2017 MEE, about 17% of examinees used the word/phrase 'equitable distribution' and received an average of 18.9 points for their essays (whereas a passing MEE essay received 13.3 points). The W/O Word column shows the average essay points for the examinees who did not use that particular word or phrase. Often, the average score for such examinees is below passing, demonstrating the importance of issue spotting and keywords in achieving a passing MEE score. In the prior example, for the 83% of examinees who did not use the word/phrase 'equitable distribution' in their answers, these examinees averaged 12.4 points on the essay (below passing). I see this occur with every MEE answer. To me, this is concrete evidence that the graders rely on the NCBE Answer Analysis for their grading and specifically look for the keywords. Thus, reviewing the released NCBE MEE answers can likely help your overall MEE score.

The MEE Analysis page examines how well an MEE score corresponds with confirmable external sources such as the above average answers, point sheet, best examinee answer, and the question itself. For example, if an examinee's MEE is highly correlated with these external sources, does the examinee receive a high grade? Conversely, if an examinee's MEE is not highly correlated with these external sources, does the examinee receive a low grade? If another jurisdiction uses the same MEE for their exam and releases above average exemplars, I also include these MEEs in the analysis (e.g. Arkansas is AR, Minnesota is MN). Examinees who participate in the MEE/MPT Comparison (more on this below) should review cases where there is low correlation but a high score (for some insight on what to do) or a high correlation but a low score (for some insight on what not to do). For example, if an exemplar has a low Essay to Point Sheet Comparison, what else did the grader find in that essay to warrant a high score? Since the graders are probably constant with each exam, examinees can use this information to fashion a response similar to the responses that graders have graded favorably in the past. On each table, your MEE results are highlighted in yellow.

The main purpose of the analysis is to enable examinees to illustrate differences between their essays and better scoring essays/MPTs to make any necessary adjustments. One portion of the essay analysis reports the top words the above average answers used that you did not use. This can give insight into whether you missed fundamental topics or lacked a vocabulary of important words related to the analysis of the essay. For example, I find that some examinees fail to use the word "because" in their answers. In an IRAC analysis, “because” is the single most important word to use when analyzing the facts in the question. The failure to use words such as "because", "since" and "as" will negatively affect your analysis and can only hurt your score (please note that the IRAC Analysis is generally more relevant to the MEE essays than the MPT).

Another portion of the analysis reports the top 20 words you used that the released above average answers did not use. This can give insight into whether you misunderstand a topic or have an inappropriate vocabulary for that topic, especially if you received a low score on the essay. The statistics can provide a wide range of insight - are your sentences per paragraph consistent with the released above average answers or is the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level too high or too low as compared to the released above average answers. For example, if you received a low score and your Essay to Question % was low, you should re-answer the question in practice to see why you did not fit more facts from the question into your analysis.

For style, examinees should modify their writing style to mimic the average style of examinees. For example, if the average examinee writes four sentences per paragraph, but you write six, you should focus on writing fewer sentences per paragraph. Examinees should mimic the average style of bar examinees to minimize any disruptions to the essay grader's reading or grading process.

MEE/MPT Comparison
With each administration, I also create an MEE/MPT comparison to help examinees better understand the bar exam essays/MPT. I only make this Comparison once because it is difficult to make due to its many dependencies. This Comparison examines a collection of MEEs/MPTs from an exam and looks through them for matching words in phrases (minimum of 2 words). The reports contain the document text with the matching phrases underlined. The reports also show PDFs of the two essays you selected side-by-side. Put simply, examinees learn by example - reviewing a collection of graded essays helps you better understand the MEE essays/MPTs. I believe this MEE/MPT comparison is incredibly useful to examinees. For example:

- You can compare any essay to any of the other examinee essays or the above average answers.
- You will see exactly what the bar examiners consider to be a passing essay/MPT.
- You can compare an essay to the best essay, the worst essay, or essays with scores with similar scores (and sometimes exactly the same score).
- You can learn how much (or how little) is written for high scoring essays.
- In the Text comparison, you can see exactly what words an essay used that the comparison essay also used.
- In the PDF comparison, you can compare the style, layout, penmanship, neatness of essays.
- In the PDF comparison, you can study the headings and format of high scoring MPTs.
- You can compare handwritten essays to typed essays.
- You can compare your MPT to the best MPTs from other states.

Following are small samples of the February and July 2010 comparisons:

FEB 2010 MPT COMPARISON SAMPLE

JULY 2010 MPT COMPARISON SAMPLE

For example, in the above July 2010 sample, there are just 10 comparisons based on 3 examinee essays and the two released above average answers. Meanwhile, in the full July 2010 essay comparison, for each essay/MPT, there are 1,596 comparisons based on 55 examinee essays and the two released above average answers. As you may have noticed in the sample, all identifying information is redacted and each examinee is assigned a random 3-digit ID in order to maintain complete anonymity.

A detailed explanation of the Comparison is below:

Click here to read more about this


The Feb 2017 Comparison includes graded essays that range from 32 to 82. Thus, you will not only be able to see what very low scoring essays are comprised of, but also what very high scoring essays are comprised of. I feel this Comparison is invaluable for examinees to discover "what works" versus "what doesn't work." In reviewing higher-graded answers, examinees can see all of the substantive ways in which their answers were lacking. For example, how many sentences do the higher-graded answers write to develop and analyze the black letter law for each issue. How does it compare to your essay? Reviewing essays that are "just passing" will give examinees insight into the content a passing essay consists of. For example, can an essay that only issue spots the issues receive a passing score. For the MPTs, you can see how passing examinees organize and write their answers. If your prior essay/MPT scores were low, you may find a style or format in these passing essays that you can incorporate into future essays. For example, an examinee that passed after using the MEE/MPT comparison told me: "I think this helped me immensely, because although I had not practiced writing any essays, I still really got a feel for the tone, length, content and structure of passing answers which created a 'voice' in my head when writing essays." To cite another example, an examinee that failed told me: "I did much better on my essays this time due in large part to your comparison tool. I found that to be extremely helpful." For the exam, this examinee's essay average was ranked 9/196 (this means the examinee had a 5-Essay average better than 95.4% of the examinees that sent me their score information). For the prior exam (before utilizing the Comparison), the examinee’s essay average was ranked 131/315 (which was better than 58.4% of the examinees that sent me their scores).

The reason essays are released is enable examinees to identify deficiencies in their essays. In a 1995 bill to bill to amend the Judiciary Law, the bill stated that it is in New York State's "best interest to insure that all bar applicants are given an equal opportunity to pass the NYS Bar Examination. Disclosure of past testing materials and applicant examinations allow prospective attorneys to become aware of testing subject matter and methodology so that otherwise qualified attorneys are not defeated in their attempts to pass the bar examination." A copy of the bill is here:
https://seperac.com/pdf/NYBOLE-Bill_To_Amend_the_Judiciary_Law-1995.pdf

In a March 2014 article entitled "It Should Be About Feedback and Revision" by J. Elizabeth Clark, an English professor at LaGuardia Community College who wrote that "[h]igh-stakes essay writing is about learning to game the system. Good test takers are just that: Students who learned the rules of the game, often through expensive test-prep courses that disadvantage poor and at-risk students. Those with greater access to coaches and materials and practice do better on the exam, but that does not mean they are better writers." This MEE/MPT comparison is an excellent way for examinees to learn "the rules of the game." Put simply, there is no other resource available that enables bar examinees to compare and contrast a wide range of graded MEEs/MPTs. Please use it to your advantage, especially if you do not have the time to practice many essays.

The MEE/MPT comparison will contain an enhancement where your MPTs will also be compared to the exemplar MPTs of other jurisdictions. For example, your MPT may be compared to the best MPTs from other states such as Arkansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, and Texas. Put simply, comparing your MPT side-by-side to a large number of high scoring MPTS is the best way to quickly and efficiently identify the deficiencies in your MPT on your own.


If you participate in the MEE/MPT Analysis and/or the MEE/MPT Comparison, I offer a $40 discount coupon code that can be used for any subscription module. I also offer a $30 discount coupon code if you are willing to complete a post-exam form after you take the exam. Please email me at joe@seperac.com if you are interested.

NOTE: If you took the exam in a state (e.g. California) that only provides your total score and MBE subscores (meaning no detailed essay/MPT scores), I can provide you with a breakdoen of these percentiles if you complete my MBE Subscore form. Starting in 2017, the scoresheets once again contain percentiles for the MBE sub-scores (this information used to be included on score reports but was removed just prior to NCBE's introduction of Civil Procedure to the MBE). These percentiles tell you how many examinees you did better than nationally for each MBE subject and overall. For example, for the Feb 2017 exam, if your %tile for Civil Procedure is 19.7, it means that you scored better than only 19.7% of examinees nationwide on the 25 graded Civil Procedure MBE questions (out of about 23,000 February 2017 examinees). What these percentiles don't tell you are your raw scores (e.g. that you answered 13/25 of the Civil Procedure MBE questions correctly, meaning 52% correct for Civil Procedure). With this information, you can correlate your exam MBE scores to your practice MBE scores (e.g. if you were getting 70% correct on Civil Procedure questions in practice but 52% correct on the exam, you should find a better source of Civil Procedure MBE practice questions). All information submitted is always treated confidentially.

For the pre-UBE New York bar exam (pass rate of 665), I have seen examinees pass on their next attempt after failing with scores as low as 530 (which would be 212 on the UBE exam). I have also seen examinees fail the exam with scores as high as 664 (which would be 265 on the UBE exam) who never subsequently pass the exam. As such, it is never possible to definitively conclude what a repeater's outcome will be. However, based on NYBOLE statistics, the likelihood of passing generally decreases with each attempt. For example, I took all the information in NYBOLE released studies from 2005-2007 discussed above and matched it up to determine MBE scores and final scores based on number of attempts (data not included was not available in the NYBOLE reports):


As you can see, according to NYBOLE's statistics, an examinee’s final score generally decreases with each attempt. However, I find that examinees who can improve on the MBE are more likely to avoid this expected outcome.

If you are taking the upcoming exam

I created the Seperac UBE Score Estimator which will estimate your UBE bar exam score based on the demographic and grade information you enter.

Click here to read more about this


With each exam, I see a lot of examinees unnecessarily panic as the exam nears. To give examinees a good understanding of their odds of passing the UBE exam, I took every available statistic from a credible source (e.g. NCBE and NYBOLE) and created a calculator based on that data. While there will always be outliers, the estimations should accurately reflect the majority of examinees sitting for the exam. These statistics will either make you feel more confident or remind you that more work needs to be put into the exam. However, even if you are in an at-risk category, your MBE practice scores (assuming the MBE practice questions are of sufficient difficulty and representative of the topics tested) will give you the most insight as to whether or not you will pass the UBE.

If you find this calculator helpful, please enter your email address and then press the Submit button to send me your information. Since this is the first iteration of the calculator, I won’t know how accurate it is until I compile results from examinees. Thus, by submitting your information, your input will help improve the accuracy of the calculator for future examinees. Thanks in advance and good luck on the exam.

I expect bar exam pass rates to continue to decline until at least 2019 (meaning your odds of passing will diminish with each exam you take). In looking at the pass rate data from 1996-2015 (2016 data will not be released until 2017), the 2015 overall national pass rate was 59%, the lowest it has ever been based on this 20 year period. I expect this trend to continue until at least 2019 because the corresponding LSAT Percentiles have also dropped (these Percentiles serve as a good predictor of future bar exam performance).

Click here to read more about this


I expect bar exam pass rates to continue to decline until at least 2019 (meaning your odds of passing will diminish with each exam you take). Bar exam pass rates are tied to the MBE (e.g. if the MBE average for an administration goes up, the pass rates almost always go up). MBE scores are correlated with LSAT scores. Thus, I use the 25th Percentile LSAT and 75th Percentile LSAT as a barometer for pass rates. If the Average LSAT for a class of matriculants drops as compared to the prior class, I similarly expect their bar exam pass rates to drop as compared to the prior class (the raw data can be viewed here).

The 2013 Full-Time Law School Matriculants (who take the bar exam in 2016) had a 25th LSAT Percentile of 152.8 and a 75th LSAT Percentile of 158.9. The 2014 Full-Time Law School Matriculants (who take the bar exam in 2017) had a 25th LSAT Percentile of 152.5 and a 75th LSAT Percentile of 158.7. Thus, because the 2014 Full-Time Law School Matriculants appear to be less knowledgeable than the 2013 Full-Time Law School Matriculants, it is reasonable to presume that the 2017 bar pass rates will be lower than the 2016 bar pass rates. The 2015 Full-Time Law School Matriculants (who take the bar exam in 2018) had a 25th LSAT Percentile of 152.4 and a 75th LSAT Percentile of 158.4 (even lower). The 2016 Full-Time Law School Matriculants (who take the bar exam in 2019) had a 25th LSAT Percentile of 151.2 and a 75th LSAT Percentile of 157.2 (even lower still). Thus, I expect bar pass rates to continue to decline until at least 2019.

Following are the national bar exam pass rates since 1996 (compiled from released NCBE data):

Likewise, I expect the pass rates for lower-ability examinees (such as foreign examinees) to decrease with the UBE exam.

Click here to read more on this


While it appears the UBE exam will be easier to study for due to fewer subjects, I believe the UBE exam will be more difficult for lower-ability examinees to pass. The NY UBE exam will consist of six 30-minute essays based on the MBE subjects plus Business Relationships, Family Law, Trusts and Estates and UCC Article 9 (30% of score), two 90-minute MPTs (20% of score), and 200 1.8 minute MBE Questions (50% of score). Accordingly, examinees would be tested for 6 hours per day for two days. Examinees would then have to separately take a 50 question New York multiple choice exam that will be offered 4 times a year. I expect the NY pass rates to stay roughly the same because the cut score is staying the same (266). However, the UBE exam is expected to be more reliable than the NY bar exam, primarily due to the MBE being 50% of the total score rather than the current 40%. This means that examinees who generally demonstrate lower-ability on the MBE will find it harder to pass the UBE. Therefore, while the UBE exam appears to be easier to study for due to fewer subjects, I believe the UBE exam will be harder to pass for examinees who generally demonstrate lower-ability on the MBE (particularly foreign examinees).

For example, I received scores from 300+ failing J15 examinees who had an average MBE score of 122 (versus the mean July scaled MBE of about 142). Their average final score was 614.6. If I convert their scores to the UBE by making their 5-essays worth 30% (instead of 40%), their MPT score worth 20% (instead of 10%) and their MBE score worth 50% (instead of 40%), then these 300+ examinees would have had an average final score of 610.6 on the UBE. This is a loss of 4 points by changing to the UBE format of scoring. Please keep in mind that this is not a perfect assessment, since MPT scores will be slightly more reliable through the answering of 2 MPTs (instead of basing the score on 1 MPT and doubling it). To cite another example, in looking at 2005-2006 NYBOLE data (this is the last time NYBOLE released comprehensive statistics on pass rates), in July 2005, Female Domestic-Educated Repeaters averaged 123.1 on the MBE while Female Foreign-Educated Repeaters averaged 118.9 on the MBE. In Feb 2006, Female Domestic-Educated Repeaters averaged 128.9 on the MBE while Female Foreign-Educated Repeaters averaged 123.2 on the MBE. Typically, the higher the MBE mean, the higher the pass rate. With the MBE carrying more weight on the UBE, the MBE’s negative effect on Foreign-Educated pass rates will be amplified. More so, the MPT will now be 20% of the score rather than 10%. The MPT is essentially a reading comprehension test where the examinees who can read and write fastest do the best. With the MPT carrying more weight on the UBE, the MPT’s negative effect on Foreign-Educated pass rates will likewise be amplified. To look at it another way, I received detailed score information from 99 examinees who sat for the Feb 2015 New York bar exam regarding their status as domestic or foreign educated. Of these 99 examinees, 39 examinees were domestic educated examinees (39.39% of the 99 examinees). These domestic educated examinees averaged 48.57 on the Essays, 49.54 on the MPT, 127.6 on the MBE, and 617.6 on the NYMC. They had an average final score of 634.2. Of these 99 examinees, 60 examinees were foreign educated examinees (60.61% of the 99 examinees). These foreign educated examinees averaged 45.95 on the Essays, 43.49 on the MPT, 119.6 on the MBE, and 629.8 on the NYMC. They had an average final score of 601.4. In looking at just the Essays (40%), MPT (10%) and MBE (40%), the domestic educated examinees scored 36.6 points more than the foreign educated examinees. The domestic educated examinees scored 11.8 points better on the Essays, 6.8 points better on the MPT and 16 points better on the MBE. This small sample supports the premise that domestic educated examinees do much better than foreign educated examinees on the MBE and MPT as opposed to the essays. In regards to the MPT, even though it is 10% of the grade, there is a 6.8 point difference. If I adjust these percentages to reflect the UBE percentages, then for the Essays (30%), MPT (20%) and MBE (50%), the domestic educated examinees will score 42.5 points more than the foreign educated examinees. This is a UBE exam bonus of 5.9 points in favor of domestic educated examinees.

 


If you are from a New York law school, I ranked the 15 New York law schools based on their 5-year July pass rates (July 2012-July 2016) based on First-time takers (taken from the New York Law Journal). This will give you a good idea of whether you are an at-risk candidate. For example, NYU has the highest overall First-time taker pass rate at 96% and Touro has the lowest overall First-time taker pass rate at 66.0%.

Click Here to expand/minimize the NY Law School 5-Year First-Time Taker July Pass Rate table

Rank School # of takers # of passers 5 Year Pass Rate
1 NYU – New York, NY
1,949
1,870
96%
2 Columbia – New York, NY
1,704
1,613
95%
3 Cornell Law School – Ithaca, NY
658
618
94%
4 Fordham Law – New York, NY 
1,916
1,695
88%
5 Brookyn Law School – Brooklyn, NY
1,843
1,587
86%
6 Syracuse University – Syracuse, NY
579
491
85%
7 Yeshiva University (Cardozo) - New York, NY
1,651
1,385
84%
8 St. John’s University – Jamaica, NY
1,226
1,022
83%
9 CUNY – Queens College – Flushing, NY
537
430
80%
10 Albany Law School-Union University – Albany, NY 
834
652
78%
11 University at Buffalo – SUNY – Buffalo, NY
900
703
78%
12 Pace University – White Plains, NY 
877
662
75%
13 Hofstra University – Hempstead, NY 
1,251
940
75%
14 New York Law School – New York, NY 
1,657
1,196
72%
15 Touro College (Fuchsberg) – Central Islip, NY
767
505
66%


Alternatively, If you recently took the exam or are a repeat-taker, please read the following:

If you recently sat for the exam

If you recently took the UBE bar exam and are unsure as to whether you passed, I have a post-exam questionnaire that you can fill out. If you think there is a reasonable probability that you may not have passed the exam, filling out this form now (while the information is still fresh in your mind) can help you later. For example, using this information, I track the key details of your attempt, so if you later find that you failed the exam, I will try to match your responses/statistics to whoever previously submitted the most comparable details (and later passed) to give you their advice on what worked for them. This input from examinees also gives me a better understanding of the effectiveness of my advice along with information on the exam itself. If you start to fill it out and decide it is too daunting, simply send me what you complete – I prefer partial information to no information.

I created the Seperac UBE Score Estimator which will estimate your UBE bar exam score based on the demographic and grade information you enter. Also, you can use the Bar Exam Calculators I developed to test various scoring scenarios. As you wait on your results, I chronicle the release dates in the Exam Results Release Dates section below.

MBE (50% of score)

First and foremost, there is no better way of knowing the exam than the exam itself. According to NCBE, those who plan to retake the examination as repeaters will gain, on average, about 8 points on the subsequent MBE attempt, but some gain more points and some actually score lower than before; and NCBE recommends that those who are planning to retake the examination purchase the MBE OPE exams and take them repeatedly up until the exam date to obtain the rationales for why the options they select are either correct or incorrect. According to NCBE, “ … [t]ests are a powerful motivator, and testing time is not a waste of instructional time if the tests are focused on important concepts. Likewise, studying for a test is a good use of learning time if the tests are testing important concepts. Testing early and often is important to provide guidance to students about whether they are on track or whether they need to study more in order to succeed in the course. … “  I believe that doing MBE practice questions is the most effective way to learn the MBE material. Accordingly, following are my MBE outlines from July 2005 that are based on the BARBRI review course. Please note that these outlines are VERY OLD since they have not been updated since 2005 so you must update them.

2005 MBE Outlines

Joe's Outlines WORD format PDF format
Constitutional Law
WORD PDF
Contracts & Sales
WORD PDF
Criminal Law & Procedure
WORD PDF
Evidence
WORD PDF
Real Property
WORD PDF
Torts
WORD PDF



MEE (30% of score)

Much like the recently released MBE questions (OPE 1-4) reflect the current MBE, the recently released MEE questions reflect the current MEE. Older MEE questions (with answers) from 2007-2012 (9 exams) can be downloaded from NCBE here. More recent MEE questions can be purchased from NCBE here. I created a UBE Essays subscription site for examinees who are looking to efficiently supplement their MEE study. This subscription is worth getting if: (1) you don’t have access to the released MEE questions/answers and plan to buy them; or (2) you are an auditory learner; or (3) you need to improve your MEE issue spotting. If you plan to buy the released MEE questions, it is more cost-effective (and extremely more efficient) to obtain these questions/answers/synopses through this UBE Essays subscription since you will save money and also have access to a significant amount of extra MEE/MPT related content. For example, there are over 30 hours of MEE Questions and Answers in MP3 format covering the past 20 MEE exams. Following is a free sample set of MP3s from the February 2008 MEE:

FEBRUARY 2008 MEE EXAM (ALL 9 QUESTIONS)

F08-MEE QUESTION 1 (WILLS AND ESTATES)
F08-MEE QUESTION 2 (TORTS)
F08-MEE QUESTION 3 (FAMILY LAW)
F08-MEE QUESTION 4 (EVIDENCE)
F08-MEE QUESTION 5 (CORPS AND LLCS)
F08-MEE QUESTION 6 (CIVIL PROCEDURE)
F08-MEE QUESTION 7 (SECURED TRANSACTIONS)
F08-MEE QUESTION 8 (CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE)
F08-MEE QUESTION 9 (TRUSTS)

Reviewing past MEEs will help you on the MEE exam because the topics repeat (and you will also improve your issue-spotting ability by learning how the issues are tested). .

MPT (20% of score)

Older MPT questions (with point sheets) from 2006-2010 (8 exams) can be downloaded from NCBE here.

MPT scores are not very reliable. Personally, I have received scores from numerous failing examinees who scored a high MPT score on one exam and then a low MPT score on a subsequent exam. The biggest problem with the MPT is its "all or nothing" nature - some examinees understand and do well on certain MPT questions/topics/tasks while other examinees find the same MPT questions/topics/tasks daunting. That is why NCBE said that there needs to be 22 different MPT questions (meaning a 33 hour MPT test) for the MPT to be as reliable as the MBE. see The Bar Examiner: Volume 77, Number 3, August 2008. Examinees who fail the exam should order their essays/MPT and participate in the Essay/MPT comparison to better understand what the graders regard as a high scoring essay/MPT.

Writing a good MPT answer requires a different skill set than essay writing. According to NCBE, when the local essays scores are compared to the other components of the exam (without adjusting for reliability), the lowest correlation is between the essays and the MPT (.43 for Essays vs. MPT; 44 for Essays vs. MEE; and .55 for Essays vs. MBE). See The Bar Examiner: Volume 77, Number 3, August 2008. From July 2001 to present, NYBOLE has released has two sample MPT answers written by actual test-takers that were regarded as representative of better than average submissions. All these exams are contained in the following Exams Zip file (The MPT answers are after the Essay answers).

The biggest mistake you can make on the MPT is to not follow instructions. For example, on the July 2011 exam, I found that a number of examinees received very low scores for failing to follow the directive of the memorandum, failing to write persuasively when required, or failing to understand of the structure of the MPT judicial system. I believe that Diane Bosse, the chair of the New York State Board of Law Examiners, wrote the December 2011 article entitled "The MPT: Assessment Opportunities beyond the Traditional Essay" partly in response to the glaring mistakes made by examinees on the July 2011 MPT. Accordingly, examinees must be cognizant of this advice when taking the MPT.


Exam Results Release Dates

Official New York bar exam results are posted on NYBOLE's website here. My chronicle of NY exam results release dates is below. FYI, since 1995, a total of 1,365,473 examinees took a bar exam in the U.S. and 927,017 passed, resulting in an overall nationwide pass rate of 67.9% (this means that by February 2017, there will have been 1,000,000+ new attorneys in the U.S. over a span of 22 years). From 2005 to present, the average number of days before the exam results release is 66 days for a February exam and 100 days for a July exam. In the past, a notification of the Release Date was generally posted one day before the Exam Results Release Date, but since 2014, there has been no pre-notification. Following is a table of release dates for the NY bar exam from 2005 to present:

New York bar exam release dates


Exam Test End Date Date of Notification of Release Date Exam Results Release Date Time of Release Days
July 2005
7/27/2005
Monday, November 14, 2005
Thursday, November 17, 2005
 
113
Feb 2006
2/22/2006
  
Friday, May 05, 2006
 
72
July 2006
7/26/2006
  
Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 
111
Feb 2007
2/28/2007
  
Friday, May 04, 2007
 
65
July 2007
7/25/2007
  
Thursday, November 15, 2007
 
113
Feb 2008
2/27/2008
  
Wednesday, May 07, 2008
 
70
July 2008
7/30/2008
Wed, November 12, 2008
Friday, November 14, 2008
 
107
Feb 2009
2/25/2009
Saturday, May 02, 2009
Tuesday, May 05, 2009
1:00PM Tuesday
69
July 2009
7/29/2009
Wed, November 04, 2009
Thursday, November 05, 2009
11:00AM Thursday 
99
Feb 2010
2/24/2010
Monday, April 26, 2010
Tuesday, April 27, 2010
1:00AM Tuesday
62
July 2010
7/28/2010
Friday, November 05, 2010
Friday, November 05, 2010
4:00PM Friday
100
Feb 2011
2/23/2011
Monday, April 25, 2011
Tuesday, April 26, 2011
9:00AM Tuesday
62
July 2011
7/27/2011
Tuesday, November 01, 2011
Wed, November 02, 2011
12:30AM Wednesday
98
Feb 2012
2/29/2012
Tuesday, May 01, 2012
Wednesday, May 02, 2012
12:30AM Wednesday
63
July 2012
7/25/2012
Thursday, November 01, 2012
Friday, November 02, 2012
11:00PM Thursday 
100
Feb 2013
2/27/2013
Wednesday, May 1, 2013
Thursday, May 2, 2013
1:00AM Thursday
64
July 2013
7/31/2013
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
12:30AM Wednesday
91
Feb 2014
2/26/2014
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Thursday, April 24, 2014
12:00AM Thursday
57
July 2014
7/30/2014
No pre-notification
Tuesday, October 28, 2014
12:00AM Tuesday
90
Feb 2015
2/25/2015
No pre-notification
Monday, April 27, 2015
5:00PM Monday
61
Jul 2015
7/29/2015
10PM Monday October 26, 2015 in NY Law Journal
Tuesday, October 27, 2015
12:00AM Tuesday
89
Feb 2016
2/24/2016
No pre-notification
Tuesday, April 26, 2016
12:00AM Tuesday
62
July 2016
7/27/2016
No pre-notification
Friday, October 28, 2016
12:00AM Friday
93
Feb 2017
2/22/17
No pre-notification
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
12:00AM Wednesday
63
July 2017
7/26/17
No pre-notification
Monday, October 23, 2017
10:30PM Monday
90
Feb 2018
2/27/18
No pre-notification
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
2:45PM Tuesday
55
July 2018
7/25/18
No pre-notification
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
9:00AM Tuesday
90

 

NYBOLE does not wait for MPRE results to be released before sending out the exam results. For example, February 2014 NY bar exam results were released on April 24, 2014 even though March 2014 MPRE results were not released until April 29, 2014.

With every administration, a few examinees awaiting results ask me whether email notices regarding admission may be a clue as to whether they passed or failed the exam. For example, I was told that the Third Department sent out their "Admission to the New York State Bar on behalf of the Third Department" to only a small number of examinees on September 9, 2014 and then a second email was sent to all Third Department examinees on September 16, 2014. In another example, in the Second Department, examinees awaiting results receive an email entitled "Notice To Second Department Applicants Anticipating Admission To The New York State Bar." While the email subject seems to suggest the examinee has passed, I am aware of examinees who received this email and subsequently found out they had failed.

These emails are sent by the Committees on Character and Fitness to anyone who recently sat for the New York State Bar Examination and do not have any bearing on whether an examinee passed or failed. I believe that the Committees on Character and Fitness for each Judicial Department do not become aware of who passed or failed the exam until the examinees do - when NYBOLE releases the results.

When results are released, all examinees receive the email with the results contained in an attached PDF file that will report whether the examinee passed or failed the exam. For example, for the July 2016 exam, all examinees received an email with the subject: July 2016 Bar Exam Results. The body of the email contained generic output that reported the examinee's BOLE ID and stated: "Please read the attached notification from the New York State Board of Law Examiners concerning your July 2016 bar examination results. DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL AS IT IS AUTOGENERATED." The name of the PDF attachment is the examinee's BOLE ID (e.g. B10000000.pdf). The only way an examinee can tell if they passed or failed without reading the PDF is from the size of the PDF - the passing PDF is about 24kb in size because it consists of 1 page while the failing PDF is about 62kb in size because it consists of 3 pages.

Release notification information for each administration from 2008 to present is below (in reverse chronological order):

Click Here to expand/minimize the release notification information

July 2018 Exam
The following was posted on NYBOLE's website at 9:00AM on Tuesday 10/23/18:

The results of the July 2018 New York State bar examination were released on October 23, 2018 to all candidates who sat for the entire examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers. If the email does not appear in your inbox please check your spam or junk folder. All results are final and no further appeal of a failed score is available. Click Here to read the Board’s press release regarding the July 2018 bar exam passing rates.

Feb 2018 Exam
The following was posted on NYBOLE's website at 2:45PM on Tuesday 4/24/18:

The results of the February 2018 New York State bar examination have been released to all candidates who sat for the entire examination. The results were emailed to candidates on April 24, 2018 at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers. If the email does not appear in your inbox please check your spam or junk folder.  

Feb 2017 Exam
The following was posted on NYBOLE's website at 12:00AM on Wednesday 4/26/17:

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The results of the February 2017 New York State bar examination have been released to all candidates who sat for the entire examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and spam filters with individual email providers. If the email does not appear in your inbox please check your spam or junk folder.

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July 2016 Exam

NOTICES:

(1) JULY 2016 BAR EXAM

* BAR EXAM RESULTS *

The results of the July 2016 New York State bar examination have been released to candidates who sat for the examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers.

The results are also available to candidates by using the private lookup link below.

If you were successful on the bar examination you must file your Application for Admission to the Bar with the appropriate department of the Supreme Court, Appellate Division within three years of the second day of the bar examination (July 27, 2016). Candidates who also completed the NYLC and took and passed the NYLE and MPRE will be certified to the Appellate Division based on their residence address. A copy of the Notice of Certification that is attached to the email must be filed with the Supreme Court, Appellate Division as part of your application for admission. The application for admission may be accessed by clicking on Admission Information in the table of contents on this website.

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Feb 2016 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website between 12:00PM midnight Monday, April 25, 2016 and 12:05AM Tuesday, April 26, 2016 and examinees began receiving emails from NYBOLE shortly thereafter. As with July 2014-July 2015 exams, NYBOLE did not give a notice before the release of results on their website.

* BAR EXAM RESULTS *

The results of the February 2016 New York State bar examination have been released to candidates who sat for the examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers.

Candidates who were successful on the bar examination must file the Application for Admission to the Bar with the appropriate department of the Supreme Court, Appellate Division within three years of the April 26, 2016 notification of passing. A copy of the Notice of Certification that is attached to the email must be filed with the Supreme Court, Appellate Division as part of the application for admission. The application for admission may be accessed by clicking on Admission Information in the table of contents on this website.

For applicants who failed the February 2016 bar exam the deadline to re-apply for the July 2016 bar exam is Tuesday, May 10, 2016.

The results are also available to candidates by using the private lookup link below.

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July 2015 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website between 12:00PM midnight Monday, October 26, 2015 and 12:05AM Tuesday, October 27, 2015 and examinees began receiving emails from NYBOLE shortly thereafter. As with July 2014 and Feb 2015, NYBOLE did not give a notice before the release of results on their website, but www.newyorklawjournal.com posted an article at 10:00PM Monday, October 26, 2015 (two hours before results were released) about the results being released on Tuesday, October 27, 2015.

*BAR EXAM RESULTS*

The results of the July 2015 New York State bar examination have been released to candidates who sat for the examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers.

Candidates who were successful on the bar examination must file the Application for Admission to the Bar with the appropriate department of the Supreme Court, Appellate Division within three years of the October 27, 2015 notification of passing. A copy of the Notice of Certification that is attached to the email must be filed with the Supreme Court, Appellate Division as part of the application for admission. The application for admission may be accessed by clicking on Admission Information in the table of contents on this website.

The results are also available to candidates by using the private lookup link below.

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Feb 2015 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 5:00PM on Monday, April 27, 2015 and examinees began receiving emails from NYBOLE shortly thereafter. As with July 2014, NYBOLE did not give a notice before the release of results.

* BAR EXAM RESULTS *

The results of the February 2015 New York State bar examination have been released to candidates who sat for the examination. The results were emailed to candidates at the email address on file with the Board. Please be advised that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers.

The results are also available to candidates by using the private lookup link below.

If you were successful on the bar examination you must file your Application for Admission to the Bar with the appropriate department of the Supreme Court, Appellate Division within three years of the April 27, 2015 letter notifying you that you passed the bar examination. A copy of the Notice of Certification that is attached to the email must be filed with the Supreme Court, Appellate Division as part of your application for admission. The application for admission may be accessed by clicking on Admission Information in the table of contents on this website.

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July 2014 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 12:00AM on Tuesday, October 28, 2014. This is the first time NYBOLE did not give a notice before the release of results and only posted the following message:

JULY 2014 Bar Examination Results

The results for candidates who sat for the July 2014 New York State bar examination have been sent to the last email address on file with the Board. There may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers. The results are also available by using the private lookup link below. Candidates will be prompted to insert their unique BOLE ID and their Date of Birth to access their results online.

Please note that, if you were successful on the bar examination, you must file your Application for Admission to the Bar with the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court within three years of the date of the letter notifying you that you passed the bar examination. A copy of the Notice of Certification that is attached to the email must be filed with the Appellate Division as part of your application for admission.

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Feb 2014 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 4:00PM on Wednesday, April 23, 2014:

The results for the February 2014 New York State bar examination will be released on April 24, 2014. The results will be sent to the candidates by email to the last address on file with the Board. Please note that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security filters with individual email providers. The results will also be available to the candidates by using the private lookup link that will be available on this site on April 24. The public list of the names of the passing candidates will be available on this site on Friday, April 25, 2014 at 12:00 pm.

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July 2013 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 4:00PM on Tuesday, October 29, 2013:

The results for the July 2013 New York State bar examination will be released on October 30, 2013. The results will be sent to the candidates by email to the last address on file with the Board. Please note that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on security issues with individual email providers. The results will also be available to the candidates by using the private lookup link that will be available on this site on October 30. The public list of the names of the passing candidates will be available on this site after 12:00 pm on October 31, 2013.

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Feb 2013 Exam

The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 3:30PM on Wednesday, May 1, 2013:

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR FEBRUARY 2013 TEST TAKERS
The results for the February 2013 New York State bar examination will be released on May 2, 2013. The results will be sent to the candidates by email to the address on file with the Board. Please note that there may be some delays in receiving the email depending on volume and security issues with individual email providers. The results will also be available to the candidates by using the private lookup link that will be available on this site on May 2. The public list of the names of the passing candidates will be available on this site on May 3, 2013.

NO FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE TIME OF RELEASE IS AVAILABLE. DO NOT CALL THE BOARD OFFICE.

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July 2012 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 9:00AM on Thursday November 1, 2012:

(1) JULY 2012 BAR EXAM RESULTS
        --POSTED NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Results from the July 2012 New York State bar examination will be released to candidates on Friday November 2, 2012. A private look-up available to candidates only will also be made available on the Board’s website at that time. Candidates will receive their results via email at the email address on file with the Board. Results will come from administration@nybarexam.org. Please allow your email inbox to accept this address.

Given the large volume of emails sent and the variety of email providers candidates use, there may be a delay in receiving your results. If you do not receive your results, please check your junk mail before contacting the Board. If you no longer have access to the email account you provided to the Board, you may submit a request, in writing, to the Board to have your email address changed. You must provide us with your name, BOLE identification number, old email address and your new email address. In the meantime, you may view your results on the private lookup using your BOLE identification number and your date of birth which will be available on November 2, 2012.

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February 2012 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 1:00PM on Tuesday May 1, 2012:

FEBRUARY 2012 BAR EXAM RESULTS WILL BE RELEASED ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 2012. Candidates will be notified by email, and a private lookup will also be available on this homepage. Due to volume ... not recieve the email by 5PM EST on May 2, 2012, you may fax a request for a duplicate notice to be sent. Please include your BOLE ID and a valid email address.

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July 2011 Exam
The following message was posted on the NY BOLE website around 10:00PM on Tuesday November 1, 2011:

Notice:

The results for candidates who sat for the July 2011 New York State bar examination have been sent to the last email address on file with the Board. There may be some delays in receiving the email depending on security issues with individual email providers and volume of email being sent. The results are also available by using the private lookup link below. Please note that, if you were successful on the bar examination, you must send the official Notice of Certification attached to email to the Appellate Division as part of your Application for Admission.

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February 2011 Exam
In April 2011, the NY BOLE website stated that the results for the February 2011 bar exam would be available mid-May 2011. On 4/25/11, the NY Law Journal website posted that February 2011 scores were being released on 4/26/11. On 4/26/11, the following was posted on the NY BOLE website in the morning (examinees began to receive scores via email around 9:00AM):

Important Notice(s) for February Bar Exam Applicants:
The results from the February 2011 bar exam were released electronically to the candidates on Tuesday, April 26, 2011. Candidates should check the account of the email address supplied to the Board in their application to sit for the bar exam. Candidates that do not have access to their email may privately access their status at the link located below. Candidates will need to enter their BOLE ID Number and their date of birth to access their pass/fail status using the following link.

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July 2010 Exam
Posted by NY BOLE on 11/5/10 in the afternoon. Examinees began to receive scores around 4:00PM:
Notice to July 2010 Bar Examination Candidates
Results of the July 2010 bar examination are being emailed to candidates beginning on November 5, 2010. It could take up to 24 hours for your results to be received and delivered by your email system. If you have not received your results by 9:00AM on Monday, November 8, you may fax a request to the Board for a duplicate letter. Please include a current, working email address. You may also access your results by clicking here. You will need your BOLE ID. If you were successful on the bar exam and certified for admission to the bar, the attachment in the email notice of your results (“Notice of Certification”) must be sent to the Appellate Division as part of your application for admission.

* The July 2010 results appeared unofficially on Above the Law on November 5, 2010. According to a Wall Street Jornal article dated November 8, 2010, the results of July's bar exam in New York were released early after someone culled part of the unreleased "pass list" from the NY BOLE website and posted the names online. John McAlary, executive director of the state Board of Law Examiners, said the board was preparing the names for release on Tuesday, November 9, 2010 and Wednesday November 10, 2010 when they learned that someone had leaked the names. NY BOLE decided it was fair to immediately send out the full results by e-mail.

Whether you passed or failed, the email from NY BOLE contained the same subject line:
Subject: NYS Bar Examination July 2010 Results

The contents of the pass email:
BOLE ID:
CANDIDATE:

The New York State Board of Law Examiners congratulates you on passing the New York State bar examination held on July 27-28, 2010.

An official Notice of Certification is attached, which you will be required to send to the Appellate Division as part of your Admission Application.

The attached notice will also contain your Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) scaled score. Please note that a score will not be reported on the attached notice if you transferred an MBE score to New York from another jurisdiction.

DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL AS IT IS AUTOGENERATED

The contents of the fail email:
BOLE ID:
CANDIDATE:

The New York State Board of Law Examiners hereby notifies you that you did not pass the New York State bar examination held on July 27-28, 2010. An official notice is attached and will include a breakdown of your scores.

Applications for the February 2011 examination must be RECEIVED at the Board office by no later than November 30, for candidates who failed the July 2010 examination. There is no provision for late filing.

You may apply online using the On-Line Application. The link to the Online Application is located on the Board?s homepage at www.nybarexam.org. If you choose to re-apply online, payment must be made by Visa or MasterCard credit cards only; debit cards are not accepted. The application fee for U.S. educated JD graduates is $250 ($750 for foreign educated candidates under Section 520.6 of the Rules of the Court of Appeals).

DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS EMAIL AS IT IS AUTOGENERATED

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February 2010 Exam
Despite snow, the bar exam was not postponed on Day 2. Here is a synopsis of the February 2010 weather situation. The following was posted on the NY BOLE web site on April 26, 2010:

Important Notice:
The February 2010 NYS Bar Exam results will be issued on Tuesday, April 27, 2010. An email will be sent to all candidates who have taken the February 2010 NYS Bar Examination with an attachment containing your examination results. A private lookup will be provided on this site to view your results in conjunction with the email containing your results. DO NOT CALL THE BOARD OFFICES ABOUT THE TIME THEY WILL BE RELEASED.

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July 2009 Exam
Posted by NY BOLE on 11/4/09 at around 3:00PM:
Important Notice for JULY 2009 BAR Exam Takers:
The results from the July 2009 bar examination will be made available to candidates, by e-mail, on November 5, 2009. You must ensure that you can accept emails from barresults@nybarapply.org. There will also be a link on this web site. to privately view your individual result by mid-day. A list of the candidates who passed the examination will be made available to the general public on Friday, November 6, 2009.

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JULY 2009 BAR EXAM STATISTICS
Following is the article: https://buffalo.bizjournals.com/buffalo/stories/2009/11/02/daily31.html

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February 2009 Exam
From NY BOLE: Results from the February 2009 bar examination will be EMAILED to all candidates on Tuesday, May 5, 2009 to the email address currently on file with the Board. The email will include an attachment with your official results, which will be in Adobe PDF.

Please note that exam results will be sent by email only; copies will NOT be sent by U.S. mail.
A link will also be available on this site on May 5 where you may view your individual results. Please do not call the Board office to obtain your exam results. You must wait until you receive the email or the link becomes available for exam results. A list of all passing candidates will be made available to the general public on this site on Wednesday, May 6, 2009.

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July 2008 Exam
From NY BOLE: The July 2008 Exam private results lookup will be available online Friday November 14 2008 at 9:00 AM. The general public lookup will be available Monday, November 17, 2008.

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February 2008 Exam
From NY BOLE: The February 2008 bar exam results secure on-line candidate lookup was on Wednesday - May 7th at 9:00 AM EDT.

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July 2005 Exam
For my exam, on Monday Nov 14, 2005, this was posted on nybarexam.org: "July 2005 examination results will be available for candidate lookup on this site Thursday, November 17th at 9:00 AM EST." The scores were mailed Nov 16, 2005 and arrived the 18th.

 

Synopsis/Disclaimer

This information on this site is for your personal and educational use. Because this site is intended for personal and educational use, do not disseminate, transmit, or duplicate any of the information contained on this site. If you find any problems with the site, please email me at joe @ seperac.com. My backup email is jseperac at gmail.com. If you found this site helpful, return the favor and donate blood. Go to The New York Blood Center or the Red Cross to find out how and where. Please also consider becoming a bone marrow donor.

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